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Geraldine Jewsbury

  • ... society ... is tolerant of crimes, and long suffering with dullness, but it shows no mercy to those who are different from other people.

    • Geraldine Jewsbury,
    • Zoë, vol. 1
    • ()
  • Our wishes never seem so little desirable as when on the verge of accomplishment; we draw back instinctively, they look so different from what we expected.

    • Geraldine Jewsbury,
    • Zoë, vol. 1
    • ()
  • ... there is no wisdom equal to that which comes after the event.

    • Geraldine Jewsbury,
    • Zoë, vol. 1
    • ()
  • ... people always make mistakes when they fancy themselves exceptions ...

    • Geraldine Jewsbury,
    • Zoë, vol. 1
    • ()
  • ... men change less than is imagined; their after life is only a kaleidescope combination of the elements of their character at the period of adolescence.

    • Geraldine Jewsbury,
    • Zoë, vol. 1
    • ()
  • What would become of the world without the Devil? Under all the different systems of religion that have guided or misguided the world for the last six thousand years, the Devil has been the grand scapegoat. He has had to bear the blame of every thing that has gone wrong. All the evil that gets committed is laid to his door, and he has, besides, the credit of hindering all the good that has never got done at all. If mankind were not thus one and all victims to the Devil, what an irredeemable set of scoundrels they would be obliged to confess themselves!

    • Geraldine Jewsbury,
    • Zoë, vol. 2
    • ()
  • Death is the last fact of which we can be certain.

    • Geraldine Jewsbury,
    • Zoë, vol. 2
    • ()
  • Whilst you live a very little religion seems enough; but believe me, it requires a great deal when you come to die.

    • Geraldine Jewsbury,
    • Zoë, vol. 2
    • ()
  • I wish there were some photographic process by which one's mind could be struck off and transferred to that of the friend we wish to know it, without the medium of this confounded letter-writing!

    • Geraldine Jewsbury,
    • 1841, in Mrs. Alexander Ireland, ed., Selections From the Letters of Geraldine Endsor Jewsbury to Jane Welsh Carlyle ()
  • But have you never noticed that when one has been trying to do something really good one is much nearer committing some special sin than when one keeps on in the selfish, matter-of-fact prudence of minding one's own business, and that alone?

    • Geraldine Jewsbury,
    • 1841, in Mrs. Alexander Ireland, ed., Selections From the Letters of Geraldine Endsor Jewsbury to Jane Welsh Carlyle ()
  • I feel to love you more and more every day, and you will laugh, but I feel towards you much more like a lover than a female friend! What would I give to see you for an hour!

    • Geraldine Jewsbury,
    • 1841, in Mrs. Alexander Ireland, ed., Selections From the Letters of Geraldine Endsor Jewsbury to Jane Welsh Carlyle ()
  • ... half-a-day's sewing would give me such a fit of depression and ennui as a week's idleness would not repair. ... I had rather wear a hair shirt than make a linen one, or alter a 'winter shawl.'

    • Geraldine Jewsbury,
    • 1841, in Mrs. Alexander Ireland, ed., Selections From the Letters of Geraldine Endsor Jewsbury to Jane Welsh Carlyle ()
  • One's conscience reproaches one much more stingingly for one's follies than one's crimes.

    • Geraldine Jewsbury,
    • 1842, in Mrs. Alexander Ireland, ed., Selections From the Letters of Geraldine Endsor Jewsbury to Jane Welsh Carlyle ()
  • Did you ever see a giraffe? ... It is like seeing something from between the regions of truth and fiction ...

    • Geraldine Jewsbury,
    • 1844, in Mrs. Alexander Ireland, ed., Selections From the Letters of Geraldine Endsor Jewsbury to Jane Welsh Carlyle ()
  • Love ... is a sacred fire that must not be burnt to idols.

    • Geraldine Jewsbury,
    • in Annie Randall White, Twentieth Century Etiquette ()

Geraldine Jewsbury, English writer

(1812 - 1880)

Full name: Geraldine Endsor Jewsbury.