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Heart

  • Anything you do from the heart enriches you, but sometimes not till years later.

  • Very rare, the intelligence of the heart. The intelligence of the whimsical brain is less rare, less attaching, sometimes tedious.

  • ... a woman's heart has no wrinkles.

  • ... the heart does not learn things as quickly as the mind ...

    • Kathleen T. Norris,
    • "Bridging the Years," Poor, Dear Margaret Kirby and Other Stories ()
  • ... regret without grief makes more intelligent discipline. Repentance of the intellect instead of the heart, is our aim; since the heart is a sensitive little instrument intended not for hammering nails, but for telling time forever.

  • O, what an untold world there is in one human heart!

  • The heart of another is a dark forest, always, no matter how close it has been to one's own.

  • ... the human heart, at whatever age, opens only to the heart that opens in return.

  • It is only in the heart that anything really happens.

  • The heart hath its mystery, and who may reveal it, / Or who ever read in the depths of their own? — / How much, we never may speak of, yet feel it, / But, even in feeling it, know it unknown!

    • L.E. Landon,
    • "A Night in May," The Venetian Bracelet ()
  • ... I think hearts are very much like glasses — if they do not break with the first ring, they usually last a considerable time.

  • ... the heart never grows old.

  • Through love, through friendship, a heart lives more than one life ...

    • Anaïs Nin,
    • 1922, Linotte, the Early Diary of Anaïs Nin, vol. 2 ()
  • Nobody has ever measured, even the poets, how much a heart can hold.

  • ... if the doors of my heart / ever close, I am as good as dead.

  • Your heart often knows things before your mind does ...

  • It's easier to gnaw through bone / than the hide of the heart.

  • I am all for people having their heart in the right place; but the right place for a heart is not inside the head.

  • Where the heart is the mind works best.

  • The heart has no wrinkles.

    • Madame de Sévigné,
    • in J. De Finod, ed., A Thousand Flashes of French Wit, Wisdom, and Wickedness ()
  • His heart was behaving in that strange way again, like a madly bouncing ball, beating the breath out of his body.

    • Helen Hudson,
    • "An Appointment With Armstrong," The Listener ()
  • There is no logic like the logic of the heart.

  • In matters of the heart it is always better to want something you don't have than to have something you don't want.

    • Patti LaBelle,
    • in Patti LaBelle and Laura Randolph Lancaster, Patti's Pearls ()
  • I'll never go. How can I? How far would I get without my heart?

  • ... the logic of the heart is absurd.

    • Julie de Lespinasse,
    • 1774, in Katharine Prescott Wormeley, trans., Letters of Mlle. de Lespinasse ()
  • The mind's pleasures are made to calm the tempests of the heart.

  • In matters of the heart, nothing is true except the improbable.

    • Madame de Staël,
    • letter (1810), in J. Christopher Herold, Mistress to an Age: A Life of Madame de Staël ()
  • It is my heart that makes my songs, not I.

  • The heart outstrips the clumsy senses, and sees — perhaps for an instant, perhaps for long periods of bliss — an undistorted and more veritable world.

  • In a full heart there is room for everything.

  • She has a heart like a poorhouse blanket with a warm side for everybody.

  • The sight of one's own heart is degrading; people are not meant to look inward — that's why they've been given bodies, to hide their souls.

  • As the rolling stone gathers no moss, so the roving heart gathers no affections.

    • Anna Jameson,
    • "Sternberg's Novels," Studies, Stories, and Memoirs ()
  • ... the human heart clings — even to its pain.

  • A young girl's heart is indestructible.

  • It was said of Moleka that he had taken his heart out of his body and hidden it in some secret place while he made love to all the women in the village. Dikeledi was the only woman who knew that. The quarrels were about where he had hidden his heart.

  • The heart that breaks open can contain the whole universe. Your heart is that large. Trust it.

  • Yet the more the heart is sated with joy, the more it becomes insatiable.

  • Hearts were made for being broken. There's really no way around it if you want to be a human being.

  • There is a chord in every heart that has a sigh in it if touched aright.

  • You can monkey with your brain, an' make it believe all sorts of tommyrot, but your heart is dead on to you, an' when it once sets in hankerin' it means business.

  • It takes a long, long time for living tissue to petrify, so long that change is incomprehensible, for a tree to turn to rock. ... It takes a long time, too, for a heart to turn to stone.

  • Human hearts are never strangers. Go past manners, customs, clothes, language to his heart and you will find a brother who will recognize, welcome and love you when he discovers you have faith in him.

  • You know, a heart can be broken, but it keeps on beating just the same.

  • The heart is the toughest part of the body. Tenderness is in the hands.

  • Be still, my beating heart, be still!

  • Ah, the heart was the body's fool.

  • Nothing is impossible to a valiant heart.

    • Jeanne d'Albret,
    • motto (1550), which her son Henri IV adopted as his own, in Virginia Frances Townsend, The Protestant Queen of Navarre ()
  • Funny how the human heart never seems to follow the rules we make for it.

  • ... never till Time is done / Will the fire of the heart and the fire of the mind be one.

    • Edith Sitwell,
    • in Elizabeth Salter and Allanah Harper, eds., Edith Sitwell: Fire of the Mind ()
  • The price of doing the right thing and of following your heart is always, in the end, the best bargain.

    • Doris Haddock,
    • with Dennis Burke, Granny D: Walking Across America in My 90th Year ()
  • My heart is broken / It is worn out at the knees ...

  • What a mystery the heart is. The mind is simple by comparison.

  • For the love of a tree, / she went out on a limb. / For the love of the sea, / she rocked the boat. / For the love of the earth, / she dug deeper. / For the love of community, / she mended fences. / For the love of stars, / she let her light shine. / For the love of spirit, / she nurtured her soul. / For the love of a good time, / she sowed seeds of happiness. / For the love of the Goddess, she drew down the moon. / For the love of nature, / she made compost. / For the love of a good meal, / she gave thanks. / For the love of family, / she reconciled differences. / For the love of creativity, / she entertained new possibilities. / For the love of her enemies, / she suspended judgment. / For the love of herself, / she acknowledged her worth. / And the world was richer for her.

  • I make money using my brains and lose money listening to my heart. But in the long run my books balance pretty well.

  • It is better to break one's heart than to do nothing with it.

  • One can overcome pride, anger, gluttony, and laziness in oneself, but the reform of a wicked and envious heart is a miracle.

  • When people ask me how we've lived past one hundred, I say, 'Honey, we never married. We never had husbands to worry us to death!'

    • Bessie Delany,
    • in Sarah and A. Elizabeth Delany with Amy Hill Hearth, Having Our Say ()
  • Life was never life to me unless my heart stood still.

  • You've got to sing like you don't need the money / Love like you'll never get hurt / You've got to dance like nobody's watchin' / It's gotta come from the heart if you want it to work.

    • Susanna Clark,
    • with Richard Leigh, song, "Come From the Heart" ()
  • Come on, is your heart a sponge or a fist?

  • Where do we begin? Begin with the heart.

  • ... the human body was a thing of beauty because so many structures protected the heart, but she realized that the human heart simply could not be protected, not by muscle, not by bone, not by anything.

  • what is stronger / than the human heart / which shatters over and over / and still lives.

  • When we discuss those we love with those who do not love them, the end of love is near.

  • The time you spend grieving over a man should never exceed the amount of time you actually spent with him.

  • Love never dies quite suddenly. He complains a great deal before expiring.

  • The best remedy for a bruised heart is not, as so many people seem to think, repose upon a manly bosom. Much more efficacious are honest work, physical activity, and the sudden acquisition of wealth.

  • After all, my erstwhile dear, / My no longer cherished, / Need we say it was not love, / Just because it perished?

  • 'Tis not love's going hurts my days, / But that it went in little ways.

  • If you can't live without me, why aren't you dead yet?

  • Falling out of love / is a rusty chain going quickly through a winch. / It hurts more than you will remember.

  • The scar of fire, the dint of steel, / Are easier than Love's wounds to heal.

  • ... while nearly every way of falling in love is kind, every way of getting out of love is cruel.

  • Pain / Rusts into beauty, too. / I know full well that this is so: / I had a heartbreak long ago.

  • Unto a broken heart / No other one may go / Without the high prerogative / Itself hath suffered too.

    • Emily Dickinson,
    • in Thomas H. Johnson, ed., The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson ()
  • But from that time until she married a small farmer in the neighborhood, Perry apparently never saw her again — never saw her even when he looked at her.

  • where have you gone / with your confident / walk your / crooked smile the / rent money / in one pocket and / my heart / in another ...

    • Mari Evans,
    • "Where Have You Gone," in Dudley Randall, ed., The Black Poets ()
  • If you haven't had at least a slight poetic crack in the heart, you have been cheated by nature. Because a broken heart is what makes life so wonderful five years later, when you see the guy in an elevator and he is fat and smoking a cigar and saying long-time-no-see. If he hadn't broken your heart, you couldn't have that glorious feeling of relief!

  • Unhappy love freezes all our affections: our own souls grow inexplicable to us. More than we gained while we were happy we lose by the reverse.

  • How do you know that love is gone? If you said you would be there at seven, you get there by nine and he or she has not called the police yet — it's gone.

  • One can't run in a park without a dog or make angels in the snow without a child and there are things one can't do without a lover, so the loss of the lover is like an amputation and the patient goes into shock.

  • Degrees / Of dying they know not ... / All great loves that have ever died dropped dead.

  • I shall go the way of the open sea, / To the lands I knew before you came, / And the cool clean breezes shall blow from me / The memory of your name.

  • Sleep on, I sit and watch your tent in silence, / White as a sail upon this sandy sea, / And know the Desert's self is not more boundless / Than is the distance 'twixt yourself and me.

  • I have heard much of these languishing lovers, but I never yet saw one of them die for love.

  • ... no one dies of a broken heart. Put together and given a reasonable rest cure, an old ticker will get you into almost as much fascinating trouble as a brand-new one.

  • He shared the pathetic belief of most of his fellow men that a change of scene can cure a broken heart.

  • Dead love is a ghost ... and a damnably dangerous ghost because it takes some of us a long time to realize that it is only a ghost.

  • To love somebody / Who doesn't love you / Is like going to a temple / And worshipping the behind / Of a wooden statue / Of a hungry devil.

    • Lady Kasa,
    • c. 8th cent., in Joanna Bankier and Deirdre Lashgari, eds., Women Poets of the World ()
  • Such silence has an actual sound, the sound of disappearance.

  • ... my life will be sour grapes and ashes without you.

  • It was as if all the love there was had been there in the beginning and had been gradually withdrawn over the years, like a savings accounts, and the balance was now at zero.

  • I just broke up with someone after three years. It was a love-hate thing. We both loved him and hated me.

    • Carol Siskind,
    • in Julia Klein, "The New Stand-Up Comics," Ms. ()
  • The end / of passion / may refashion / a friend.