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Hope

  • ... it's the young who take chances, for whom Hope is a flag that never flies at half-mast.

  • When hope is hungry, everything feeds it.

  • Hope is the feeling we have that the feeling we have is not permanent.

  • I try to tell people to keep having hope. It's always what you don't know and don't expect that's gonna be so great.

  • Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement; nothing can be done without hope.

  • Hope is a slow business.

  • Hope is a talent like any other.

  • She dares — the young Spring — to dance on that ancient grave, / To dance with delicate feet / On the world's despair and defeat, / On the Winter that covers all / With an ashen pall.

  • Isn't hope an incredible, a wonderfully demented thing?

  • The most spectacular success was first a hope.

  • But wasn't a lost cause the last thing you should ever give up, if you were fortunate enough to possess one? How else could you add so much drama to your life at so little cost?

  • Hope lights up our darkness.

  • ... hope is a very unruly emotion.

  • ... the heaviest anguish often precedes a return tide of joy and courage.

  • The longest day must have its close, — the gloomiest night will wear on to a morning. An eternal, inexorable lapse of moments is ever hurrying the day of the evil to an eternal night, and the night of the just to an eternal day.

  • Hope gives us something to do when we are afraid of what might happen.

  • After all, tomorrow is another day.

  • Whatever comes, this too shall pass away.

  • How is it that hope so powerfully excites, and fear so absolutely depresses all our faculties?

    • Maria Edgeworth,
    • 1814, in Augustus J.C. Hare, ed., The Life and Letters of Maria Edgeworth, vol. 1 ()
  • Hope can produce the finest and most permanent springs of action.

    • Maria Edgeworth,
    • 1842, in Augustus J.C. Hare, ed., The Life and Letters of Maria Edgeworth, vol. 2 ()
  • Even if their outward fortunes could be absolutely equalized, there would be, from individual constitution alone, an aristocracy and a democracy in every land. The fearful by nature would compose an aristocracy, the hopeful by nature a democracy, were all other causes of divergence done away.

  • How many glorious structures we had raised / Upon Hope's sandy basis!

    • L.E. Landon,
    • "St. George's Hospital," The Improvisatrice ()
  • ... how Disappointment tracks / The steps of Hope.

    • L.E. Landon,
    • "A History of the Lyre," The Venetian Bracelet ()
  • ... hope is a timid thing, / Fearful, and weak, and born in suffering.

  • These are my unreasonable hopes, and I do not see why hopes should ever be reasonable. They're no fun if they are ...

  • ... to hope for Paradise is to live in Paradise, a very different thing from actually getting there.

  • When hope is taken away from a people moral degeneration follows swiftly after.

  • ... to eat bread without hope is still slowly to starve to death.

  • Th' longest lane will have a turning ...

  • Despair was the killer. I had to prepare, hold hope between my palms like the flame of the last match in a long Arctic night.

  • 'Hope' is the thing with feathers — / That perches in the soul — / And sings the tune without the words — / And never stops at all — .

    • Emily Dickinson,
    • c. 1861, in Thomas H. Johnson, ed., The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson ()
  • Hope is a strange invention — / A Patent of the Heart — / In unremitting action / Yet never wearing out-- ...

    • Emily Dickinson,
    • c. 1877, in Thomas H. Johnson, ed., The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson ()
  • Hope is a dream deferred.

    • Jennifer Stone,
    • "Homage to James Baldwin (1924-1987)," Stone's Throw ()
  • Sad soul, take comfort, nor forget / that sunrise never failed us yet!

  • Hope ... is not a feeling; it is something you do.

  • We give birth to others / by believing in that first, small spark of life / the spark we can barely see. / It is called hope. / It is immensely helpful / at birth.

  • Hope sinks a world of imagination.

  • We must always live in hope; without that consolation there would be no living.

    • Madame de Sévigné,
    • 1671, Letters of Madame de Sévigné to Her Daughter and Her Friends, vol. 1 ()
  • ... by and large, nothing is as bad as you fear, or as good as you hope.

  • It's been a rare year, o paper soul, and against all the preceding bitterness and bile, this one shining scrawl ... maybe I should fold you away to pull you out again in a decade, see whether the flowering that now seems promised, came; see whether it was untimely frostbit, or died without fruit, because you chart the real deeps of me. No: I hold you a pelorus, a flexing mirror, strange quarters for the wind of God.

  • Hope is a terrible thing when you have accustomed yourself to despair.

    • Lynn Laitala,
    • "Healing and Heartbreak in the Finnish American Community," in The Finnish American Reporter ()
  • Hope begins in the dark, the stubborn hope that if you just show up and try to do the right thing, the dawn will come. You wait and watch and work: you don't give up.

  • ... the very least you can do in your life is to figure out what you hope for. And the most you can do is live inside that hope. Not admire it from a distance but live right in it, under its roof.

  • Hope does not necessarily have to take an object ...

  • If there is such a thing as sin in this world, I think it must be shutting oneself up against hope.

  • Eyes see what they hope for.

    • Diana Cooper,
    • 1953, in Artemis Cooper, ed., The Letters of Evelyn Waugh and Diana Cooper ()
  • Rage for the world as it is / but for what it may be / more love now than last year ...

  • 'Another world is possible!' ... Another world is also necessary, for this one is unjust, unsustainable, and unsafe. It's up to us to envision, fight for, and create that world, a world of freedom, real justice, balance, and shared abundance, a world woven in a new design.

  • ... hope costs nothing.

  • A comforting acquaintance, hope, a contagious thing like spring, inebriating like lager.

  • ... the road that is built in hope is more pleasant to the traveler than the road built in despair, even though they both lead to the same destination.

  • As I move through the day, I drink from the eternal fountain of hope.

  • Hope is good. Without it, well, you do the math. But hope has to be like a prayer. Putting it out there to something more powerful than yourself.

  • ... the willow plate was the only beautiful thing the Larkins owned. It was a blue willow plate, and in its pattern of birds and willows and human figures it held a story that for Janey never grew old. Its color, deep and unchanging, brought to her the promise of blue skies even on the grayest days and of blue oceans even in an arid wasteland.

  • Living on hope is like being hungry all the time.

  • Whatever with the past is gone, / the best is always yet to come.

    • Lucy Larcom,
    • "Thirty-Five," The Poetical Works of Lucy Larcom ()
  • Children of yesterday, / Heirs of to-morrow, / What are you weaving? / Labor and sorrow? / Look to your looms again. / Faster and faster / Fly the great shuttles / Prepared by the Master, / Life's in the loom, / Room for it — / Room!

    • Mary Lasswell,
    • "Song of Hope," Poems of Mary Artemisia Lathbury ()
  • ... hope is not a plan of action.

  • Like a peddler whose wares have been turned down all day, he waited, with a look of patient expectation, for contradiction.

    • Elizabeth Hardwick,
    • "The Purchase," in Edward Joseph Harrington and Martha Foley, eds., The Best American Short Stories and the Yearbook of the American Short Story ()
  • If we have had no past, it is well for us to look hopefully to the future — for the shadows bear the promise of a brighter coming day ...

  • Though the morning seems to linger / O'er the hill-tops far away, / Yet the shadows bear the promise / Of a brighter coming day.

  • What a poet is hope! what a painter the memory!

  • The hope is always here, always alive, but only your fierce caring can fan it into a fire to warm the world.

  • Our faith in the present dies out long before our faith in the future.

    • Ruth Benedict,
    • 1913, in Margaret Mead, An Anthropologist at Work: Writings of Ruth Benedict ()
  • I see the world gradually being turned into a wilderness, I hear the ever approaching thunder, which will destroy us too. I can feel the sufferings of millions and yet, if I look up into the heavens, I think that it will all come [out] right, that this cruelty too will end, and that peace and tranquility will return again. In the meantime, I must uphold my ideals, for perhaps the time will come when I shall be able to carry them out.

  • There are no hopeless situations; there are only people who have grown hopeless about them.

  • The vessel has gone down, but there may be a little boat somewhere; our sail may be torn to ribbons, but we have oars still; if we can not row, perhaps we can swim. Somehow or other we may touch land.

  • There never was night that had no morn.

  • Take hope from the heart of man, and you make him a beast of prey.

  • Music played in the resurrection ashes.

  • In very truth it is the unattained which gives zest to the commonplace and brims the cup of our daily life with keenest joy.

  • The lowest ebb is the turn of the tide.

  • Don't give up before the miracle happens.

  • False hope is better than no hope at all.

  • ... even the worst moments and the weariest journeys must come to an end ...

  • The weariest nights, the longest days, sooner or later must perforce come to an end.

  • ... the sickness of hope deferred crept like poison through her veins.

  • No hardy perennial has the enduring quality of hope. Cut it to the roots, stamp it underfoot, let frost and fire work their will, and still some valiant shoot will push, to grow again on such scanty fare as it can find. Only time and the cruel quicklime of fact can destroy that stubborn urgency.

  • ... it is from despair that all your ailments have come ... And hope is always the best medicine.

  • What a strange thing is memory, and hope; one looks backward, the other forward. The one is of today, the other is of tomorrow. Memory is history recorded in our brain, memory is a painter, it paints pictures of the past and of the day.

  • Hope is a song in a weary throat.

  • No one has a right to sit down and feel hopeless. There's too much work to do.

  • ... I learned from pleasant experience that at the most despairing crisis, when all looked sour beyond words, some delightful 'break' was apt to lurk just around the corner.

  • The hopes that lost in some far distance seem, / May be the truer life, and this the dream.

  • No star is ever lost we once have seen, / We always may be what we might have been ...

  • There's never been a night yet that didn't end eventually.

  • Hopes are what your waking mind can imagine. Like prayers. Like bridges you can cross to a better place. And however wild these hopes may be, they are still basically thinkable things. But dreams ... dreams are the unthinkable, the unsayable.

  • To lose hope in the future is to begin to die.

  • Every heart has a miracle to pray for. Every life holds that which only a miracle can cure. To prove that there have never been, that there can never be, miracles does not alter the matter. So long as there is something hoped for, — that does not come in the legitimate channel of possible events, — just so long will the miracle be prayed for.

    • Grace King,
    • "The Miracle Chapel," Balcony Stories ()
  • The dream — you never achieve it. The excitement of life lies in the hope, in the striving for something rather than the attainment.

  • Hope is slowly extinguished and quickly revived.

  • It requires but a few threads of hope, for the heart that is skilled in the secret, to weave a web of happiness.

  • Any chance beats no chance.

  • Hope is the forward-looking part of memory.

  • Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing.

  • flowers grow / out of the dark / moments.

  • ... in this great war [WWI] ... they had, all of them, on all sides, lost their freedom. The freedom to think hopefully of the future.

  • If you run out of hope at the end of the day, rise in the morning and put it on again with your shoes. Hope is the only reason you won't give in, burn what's left of the ship, and go down with it — the ship of your natural life and your children's only shot.

  • Let us remember Spring will come again.