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Childfree

  • My dogs, the only creatures on the planet marked by my singular nurturing imprint, have all turned out to be rude and self-absorbed. In all likelihood, if they were children instead of dogs, I would have foisted more Charlie Sheens or Kardashians onto our crumbling culture.

    • Merrill Markoe,
    • "Why I Never Had a Kid," in Henriette Mantel, ed., No Kidding: Women Writing on Bypassing Parenthood ()
  • The traditional rules for having children are long gone. Some days I feel like the harder choice is to not have a kid.

    • Henriette Mantel,
    • "The Morning Dance," in Henriette Mantel, ed., No Kidding: Women Writing on Bypassing Parenthood ()
  • [On deciding not to have children:] Yes, there is a little sadness ... But there's also a little sadness around the fact I may never get to go to the moon. Jeez, you can't do everything in this lifetime.

    • Henriette Mantel,
    • "The Morning Dance," in Henriette Mantel, ed., No Kidding: Women Writing on Bypassing Parenthood ()
  • This sense of some mandate to reproduce seems rather outdated to me. When God said be fruitful and multiply, there were only two people.

    • Betsy Salkind,
    • "Why I Didn't Have Any Children This Summer," in Henriette Mantel, ed., No Kidding: Women Writing on Bypassing Parenthood ()
  • In every sphere, American society has come to accept personal proclivities — from religion and gender to clothing ... Yet the assumption that women are biologically programmed to conceive refuses to crumble. The right to choose seems to have bypassed the childless.

    • Elinor Burkett,
    • "Emancipation From Propagation," in Lori Leibovich, ed., Maybe Baby ()
  • Public obsession with the child-rearing plans of others is a curious social tic. At least until we entered into the age of glorified public confession, Americans were politely hesitant to pry into one another's lives.

    • Elinor Burkett,
    • "Emancipation From Propagation," in Lori Leibovich, ed., Maybe Baby ()
  • Never once in my twenties and thirties did I hope for a child, or feel more than a vague good-will towards anyone else's child. When other women yearned towards babies I kept silent to hide my own feelings, and as for toddlers, I didn't go so far as to blame them for being what they were, but I did feel that they were tedious to have around except in very small doses.

  • ... I think that childfree by choice is the new gay. We're the new disenfranchised group. People think we're irresponsible, immoral sluts and that our lifestyle is up for debate.

  • Parenthood can be very rewarding, but let's face it, so are margaritas at the adults-only pool.

  • I don't want to have kids and so I am not going to have kids. People who want kids are going to have kids. I'm doing what I want to do and people who want kids are doing what they want to do. What about this scenario makes me selfish?

  • The urge that most people feel to have kids is the exact same as the urge that I have to not have kids. I do not want to raise a child.