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Dorothy Wordsworth

  • The moonlight lay upon the hills like snow.

    • Dorothy Wordsworth,
    • in William Knight, ed., Journals of Dorothy Wordsworth, vol. 1 ()
  • Scotland is the country above all others that I have seen, in which a man of imagination may carve out his own pleasures; there are so many inhabited solitudes.

    • Dorothy Wordsworth,
    • in William Knight, ed., Journals of Dorothy Wordsworth, vol. 1 ()
  • Upon the highest ridge of that round hill covered with planted oaks, the shafts of the trees show in the light like the columns of a ruin.

    • Dorothy Wordsworth,
    • 1798, in William Knight, ed., Journals of Dorothy Wordsworth, vol. 1 ()
  • One only leaf upon the top of a tree — the sole remaining leaf — danced round and round like a rag blown by the wind.

    • Dorothy Wordsworth,
    • 1798, in William Knight, ed., Journals of Dorothy Wordsworth, vol. 1 ()
  • I went through the fields, and sat for an hour afraid to pass a cow. The cow looked at me, and I looked at the cow, and whenever I stirred the cow gave over eating.

    • Dorothy Wordsworth,
    • 1802, in William Knight, ed., Journals of Dorothy Wordsworth, vol. 1 ()
  • I never saw daffodils so beautiful. They grew among the mossy stones about and above them; some rested their heads upon these stones, as on a pillow, for weariness ...

    • Dorothy Wordsworth,
    • 1802, in William Knight, ed., Journals of Dorothy Wordsworth, vol. 1 ()
  • The moon had the old moon in her arms ...

    • Dorothy Wordsworth,
    • 1802, in William Knight, ed., Journals of Dorothy Wordsworth, vol. 1 ()
  • The columbine ... is a graceful slender creature, a female seeking retirement, and growing freest and most graceful where it is most alone. I observed that the more shaded plants were always the tallest.

    • Dorothy Wordsworth,
    • 1802, in William Knight, ed., Journals of Dorothy Wordsworth, vol. 1 ()
  • Mary first met us in the avenue. She looked so fat and well that we were made very happy by the sight of her ...

    • Dorothy Wordsworth,
    • 1802, in William Knight, ed., Journals of Dorothy Wordsworth, vol. 1 ()
  • ... it is a pleasure to a real lover of Nature to give winter all the glory he can, for summer will make its own way, and speak its own praises.

    • Dorothy Wordsworth,
    • 1802, in William Knight, ed., Journals of Dorothy Wordsworth, vol. 1 ()
  • Blessings on that brother of mine!

    • Dorothy Wordsworth,
    • 1802, in William Knight, ed., Journals of Dorothy Wordsworth, vol. 1 ()
  • I found a strawberry blossom in a rock. The little slender flower had more courage than the green leaves, for they were but half expanded and half grown, but the blossom was spread full out. I uprooted it rashly, and I felt as if I had been committing an outrage, so I planted it again. It will have but a stormy life of it, but let it live if it can.

    • Dorothy Wordsworth,
    • 1802, in William Knight, ed., Journals of Dorothy Wordsworth, vol. 1 ()
  • Every question was like the snapping of a little thread about my heart.

    • Dorothy Wordsworth,
    • 1802, in William Knight, ed., Journals of Dorothy Wordsworth, vol. 1 ()
  • The moon shone like herrings in the water.

    • Dorothy Wordsworth,
    • 1800, in E. de Selincourt, Journals of Dorothy Wordsworth ()
  • ... I verily believe that I never took infant in my arms that did not the moment it was there by its cries beg to be removed.

    • Dorothy Wordsworth,
    • 1790, in Alan G. Hill, ed., The Letters of Dorothy Wordsworth ()
  • ... I think one of the dullest things in the world is a letter filled with apologies for not writing sooner.

    • Dorothy Wordsworth,
    • 1790, in Alan G. Hill, ed., The Letters of Dorothy Wordsworth ()
  • An injudicious and malignant enemy often serves the cause he means to injure; but a feeble friend never attains that end.

    • Dorothy Wordsworth,
    • 1790, in Alan G. Hill, ed., The Letters of Dorothy Wordsworth ()

Dorothy Wordsworth, English diarist, poet

(1771 - 1855)