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Julia Child

  • The tomato hides its griefs. Internal damage is hard to spot ...

  • ... noodles are not only amusing but delicious ...

  • Without peanuts, it isn't a cocktail party.

  • Food like love is a deeply emotional matter.

  • Fake food — I mean those patented substances chemically flavored and mechanically bulked out to kill the appetite and deceive the gut — is unnatural, almost immoral, a bane to good eating and good cooking.

  • Some children like to make castles out of their rice pudding, or faces with raisins for eyes. It is forbidden — so sternly that, when they grow up, they take a horrid revenge by dying meringues pale blue or baking birthday cakes in the form of horseshoes or lyres or whatnot.

  • There are reasons, and then there are excuses.

  • Life itself is the proper binge.

    • Julia Child,
    • in Time ()
  • In France cooking is a serious art form and a national sport.

    • Julia Child,
    • in New York Times ()
  • Remember, you are all alone in the kitchen and no one can see you.

    • Julia Child,
    • in Cork Millner, Portraits ()
  • Cooking may be a creative art, but it's also a wonderful full-time hobby.

    • Julia Child,
    • in Cork Millner, Portraits ()
  • ... the more experience you have, the more interesting cooking is because you know what can happen to the food. In the beginning you can look at a chicken and it doesn't mean much, but once you have done some cooking you can see in that chicken a parade of things you will be able to create.

    • Julia Child,
    • in Cork Millner, Portraits ()
  • The problem for cookery-bookery writers like me is to understand the extent of our readers' experience. I hope have solved that riddle in my books by simply telling everything. The experienced cook will know to skip through the verbiage, but the explanations will be there for those who still need them.

    • Julia Child,
    • in Cork Millner, Portraits ()
  • Any disaster is a learning process.

    • Julia Child,
    • in Cork Millner, Portraits ()
  • I don't use the word gourmet. The word doesn't mean anything anymore. 'Gourmet' makes it sound like someone is putting sherry wine in the corn-flake casserole.

    • Julia Child,
    • in Cork Millner, Portraits ()
  • It's a shame to be caught up in something that doesn't absolutely make you tremble with joy.

    • Julia Child,
    • in Bottom Line/Tomorrow ()
  • A cookbook is only as good as its worst recipe.

    • Julia Child,
    • in Regina Schrambling, "Julia Child, the French Chef for a Jell-O Nation, Dies at 91," The New York Times ()
  • Certainly one of the important requirements for learning how to cook is that you also learn how to eat.

  • Moderation. Small helpings. Sample a little bit of everything. These are the secrets of happiness and good health.

    • Julia Child
  • Find something you're passionate about and keep tremendously interested in it.

    • Julia Child
  • There's no end to imagination in the kitchen.

    • Julia Child,
    • in Lynn Gilbert and Gaylen Moore, eds., Particular Passions ()
  • It's so beautifully arranged on the plate — you know someone's fingers have been all over it.

    • Julia Child
  • There is nothing nicer than a kitchen really made for a cook. Things that are designed to be used always have an innate beauty.

    • Julia Child
  • In department stores, so much kitchen equipment is bought indiscriminately by people who just come in for men's underwear.

    • Julia Child,
    • in James Beasley Simpson, ed., Simpson's Contemporary Quotations ()
  • When you flip anything, you just have to have the courage of your convictions.

    • Julia Child,
    • in Michael Pollan, "Out of the Kitchen, Onto the Couch," The New York Times ()
  • It's hard to imagine a civilization without onions; in one form or another their flavor blends into almost everything in the meal except the desert.

  • The only real stumbling block is fear of failure. In cooking you've got to have a what-the-hell attitude.

    • Julia Child,
    • in Julia Child with Alex Prud'homme, My Life in France ()
  • I just hate health food.

    • Julia Child
  • The only time to eat diet food is while you're waiting for the steak to cook.

    • Julia Child,
    • in The Wall Street Journal ()
  • Cassoulet, that best of bean feasts, is everyday fare for a peasant but ambrosia for a gastronome, though its ideal consumer is a 300-pound blocking back who has been splitting firewood nonstop for the last twelve hours on a subzero day in Manitoba.

  • A party without cake is just a meeting.

    • Julia Child
  • Noncooks think it's silly to invest two hours' work in two minutes' enjoyment; but if cooking is evanescent, well, so is the ballet.

  • Drama is very important in life: You have to come on with a bang. You never want to go out with a whimper. Everything can have drama if it’s done right. Even a pancake.

    • Julia Child

Julia Child, U.S. chef, TV personality, writer

(1912 - 2004)

Full name: Julia McWilliams Child