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Rose Wilder Lane

  • Constant repetition dulls receptivity ..

    • Rose Wilder Lane,
    • 1928, in William Holtz, ed., Dorothy Thompson and Rose Wilder Lane: Forty Years of Friendship ()
  • It was not seen that woman's place was in the home until she began to go out of it; the statement was a reply to an unspoken challenge, it was attempted resistance to irresistible change.

  • We are never aware of the present; each instant of living becomes perceptible only when it is past, so that in a sense we do not live at all, but only remember living.

  • Our quilts were more than useful, they had the faint sentimentality of a pressed flower. And no more beauty. We did not value them for their appearance, but for the memories in them, for their good wearing qualities and the thrift they represented.

  • A kiss without a mustache is like an egg without salt.

  • We are all so clumsy, my dear, and words are all we have, poor signals like bonfires and flags trying to express what shipwreck is.

    • Rose Wilder Lane,
    • 1927, in William Holtz, ed., Dorothy Thompson and Rose Wilder Lane: Forty Years of Friendship ()
  • Houses are the abiding joys; they are the most emotion-stirring of all things. An automobile is regarded with fond affection, a typewriter becomes the inseparable companion, clothes can stir sentimentality, and the bit of bric-a-brac is a toy one would weep to see torn away — but houses are real, deep, emotional things. How much excitement in the cutting of a window, what enormous importance in the angle of a roof!

    • Rose Wilder Lane,
    • 1927, in William Holtz, ed., Dorothy Thompson and Rose Wilder Lane: Forty Years of Friendship ()
  • ... no one in a group of three is the same person he (she, it) is in a group of two. No more than he is the same in a group of two as he is alone.

    • Rose Wilder Lane,
    • 1928, in William Holtz, ed., Dorothy Thompson and Rose Wilder Lane: Forty Years of Friendship ()
  • I ask myself, 'why am I so lazy?' and am too lazy to reply.

    • Rose Wilder Lane,
    • 1928, in William Holtz, ed., Dorothy Thompson and Rose Wilder Lane: Forty Years of Friendship ()
  • Curiosity is the hunger of the human mind.

    • Rose Wilder Lane,
    • 1928, in William Holtz, ed., Dorothy Thompson and Rose Wilder Lane: Forty Years of Friendship ()
  • Most of the time it is much more important to a cat to recognize that another animal is a cat, not a dog, than it is to recognize that the other animal is a male cat or a female cat. I think it is more important to recognize that another human being is a human being, than to recognize male and female. Most of our activities have no more to do with sex than they have to do with ancestors. From one point of view, you can truthfully say that my grandfathers have everything to do with all my thoughts, emotions, and actions. But I do not see that it follows that everyone I meet should fix his attention upon my family tree.

    • Rose Wilder Lane,
    • 1929, in William Holtz, ed., Dorothy Thompson and Rose Wilder Lane: Forty Years of Friendship ()
  • All lives are tragic. I wish yours had not been, and we know that that is wishing that you had not lived, so I take it back quickly and so do you.

    • Rose Wilder Lane,
    • 1960, in William Holtz, ed., Dorothy Thompson and Rose Wilder Lane: Forty Years of Friendship ()
  • Writing fiction is ... an endless and always defeated effort to capture some quality of life without killing it.

    • Rose Wilder Lane
  • Happiness is something that comes into our lives through doors we don't even remember leaving open.

    • Rose Wilder Lane

Rose Wilder Lane, U.S. journalist, writer, political theorist

(1886 - 1968)