Welcome to the web’s most comprehensive site of quotations by women. 44,279 quotations are searchable by topic, by author's name, or by keyword. Many of them appear in no other collection. And new ones are added continually.

See All TOPICS Available:
See All AUTHORS Available:

Search by Topic:

  • topic cats
  • topic books
  • topic moon

Find quotations by TOPIC (coffee, love, dogs)
or search alphabetically below.

Search by Last Name:

  • Quotes by Zora Neale Hurston
  • Quotes by Louisa May Alcott
  • Quotes by Chingling Soong

Find quotations by the AUTHOR´S LAST NAME
or alphabetically below.

Search by Keyword:

  • keyword fishing
  • keyword twilight
  • keyword Australie

Fannie Lou Hamer

  • ... I'm sick and tired of being sick and tired.

    • Fannie Lou Hamer,
    • in Jerry DeMuth, "Tired of Being Sick and Tired," in The Nation ()
  • When they asked for those to raise their hands who'd go down to the courthouse the next day [to vote], I raised mine. Had it up as high as I could get it. I guess I'd had any sense I'd a-been a little scared, but what was the point of being scared. The only thing they could do to me was kill me and it seemed like they'd been trying to do that a little bit at a time ever since I could remember.

    • Fannie Lou Hamer,
    • To Praise Our Bridges: An Autobiography of Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer
    • ()
  • ... when I liberate myself, I'm liberating other people.

    • Fannie Lou Hamer,
    • speech ()
  • ... if this is a Great Society, I'd hate to see a bad one.

    • Fannie Lou Hamer,
    • in The Worker ()
  • [On the special requirements for blacks registering to vote:] That literacy test was rough. The registrar, Mr. Campbell, brought this big black book over there, and pointed out something for me to read. It was the 16th section of the Constitution of Mississippi ... dealing with de facto laws. I know as much about a de facto law as a horse knows about Christmas Day. And he told me to read it and copy. Then after I had copied it, give a reasonable interpretation. So you know about what happened to me. Well, I flunked the test, you know, 'cause I didn't know what in the world was a de facto law. Still don't really know what it is.

    • Fannie Lou Hamer,
    • 1962, in David Rubel, Fannie Lou Hamer ()
  • [On those trying to obstruct her work for civil rights:] There was nothing they could do to me. They couldn't fire me, because I didn't have a job. They couldn't put me out of my house, because I didn't have one. They was nothing they could take from me any longer.

    • Fannie Lou Hamer,
    • 1962, in David Rubel, Fannie Lou Hamer ()
  • [On a tour of black-governed African countries:] Being from the South, we never was taught much about our African heritage. The way everybody talked to us, everybody in Africa was savages and real stupid people. But I've seen more savage white folks here in America than I seen in Africa. I saw black men flying the airplanes, driving the buses, sitting behind the big desks in the bank, and just doing everything that I was used to seeing white people do.

    • Fannie Lou Hamer,
    • 1964, in David Rubel, Fannie Lou Hamer ()
  • [On her Freedom Farm Cooperative:] If you give a hungry man food, he will eat it. [But] if you give him land, he will grow his own food.

    • Fannie Lou Hamer,
    • in David Rubel, Fannie Lou Hamer
  • With the people, for the people, by the people, I crack up when I hear it; I say, with the handful, for the handful, by the handful, 'cause that's really what happens ...

    • Fannie Lou Hamer,
    • 1965, in Kay Mills, This Little Light of Mine ()
  • ... nobody's free until everybody's free.

    • Fannie Lou Hamer,
    • speech (1971), in Kay Mills, This Little Light of Mine ()
  • ... if I fall, I will fall five-feet four-inches forward in the fight for freedom.

    • Fannie Lou Hamer,
    • in Kay Mills, This Little Light of Mine ()
  • ... just because people are fat, it doesn't mean they are well fed. The cheapest foods are the fattening ones, not the most nourishing.

    • Fannie Lou Hamer,
    • in Kay Mills, This Little Light of Mine ()
  • Take a very close look at this American society. It's time to question these things ...

    • Fannie Lou Hamer,
    • in Penny Colman, Fanny Lou Hamer and the Fight for the Vote ()
  • [On including both blacks and whites in her Freedom Farm Cooperative:] Hunger has no color line.

    • Fannie Lou Hamer,
    • in Penny Colman, Fanny Lou Hamer and the Fight for the Vote ()
  • I'm not hung up on this thing about liberating myself from the black man. I'm not going to try that thing. I got a black husband, six feet three, two hundred and forty pounds, with a fourteen shoe, that I don't want to be liberated from.

    • Fannie Lou Hamer,
    • in Susie Erenrich, ed., Freedom Is a Constant Struggle: An Anthology of the Mississippi Civil Rights Struggle ()
  • I know 'bout as much about communism as a horse knows about Christmas. ... If they ain't calling you a Communist, you ain't doing your job.

    • Fannie Lou Hamer,
    • in Unita Blackwell, Barefootin' ()

Fannie Lou Hamer, U.S. civil rights leader

(1917 - 1977)

Full name: Fannie Lou Townsend Hamer.