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Frances Hesselbein

  • ... I never look at my watch if I'm talking with someone. I think that's such an insulting gesture! It suggests you're trying to gauge whether you think what they're saying is worth your time. Rushing is no way to bring out what's best in people, and I'm always looking for the best. That's what's ultimately behind my determination to take my time.

    • Frances Hesselbein,
    • in Sally Helgesen, The Female Advantage: Women's Ways of Leadership ()
  • I feel passionately about how I express myself. Language is the greatest motivating force. You can phrase something positively and inspire people to do their best, or negatively and make them feel worried, uncertain, and self-conscious. You can talk at a fast pace and people will get nervous, feel afraid to bring up extraneous thoughts. But those are the very thoughts that might be most important! They might represent that person's best thinking. If you're rushed, you're simply not going to get at that extra level of thinking.

    • Frances Hesselbein,
    • in Sally Helgesen, The Female Advantage: Women's Ways of Leadership ()
  • ... I try ... to use my own voice in a way that shows caring, respect, appreciation, and patience. Your voice, your language, help determine your culture. And part of how a corporate culture is defined is how the people who work for an organization use language.

    • Frances Hesselbein,
    • in Sally Helgesen, The Female Advantage: Women's Ways of Leadership ()
  • It's not hard work that wears you out, but the repression of your true personality, and I've found a way of working that does not demand that.

    • Frances Hesselbein,
    • in Sally Helgesen, The Female Advantage: Women's Ways of Leadership ()
  • The three major challenges CEOs will face have little to do with managing the enterprise's tangible assets and everything to do with monitoring the quality of: leadership, the work force, and relationships.

    • Frances Hesselbein,
    • in Frances Hesselbein, Marshall Goldsmith, and Richard Beckhard, eds., The Leader of the Future ()
  • The leader beyond the millennium will not be the leader who has learned the lessons of how to do it, with ledgers of 'hows' balanced with 'its' that dissolve in the crashing changes ahead. The leader for today and the future will be focused on how to be — how to develop quality, character mind-set, values, principles, and courage.

    • Frances Hesselbein,
    • in Frances Hesselbein, Marshall Goldsmith, and Richard Beckhard, eds., The Leader of the Future ()
  • Key to the societal significance of tomorrow's leaders is the way they embrace the totality of leadership, not just including 'my organization' but reaching beyond the walls as well.

    • Frances Hesselbein,
    • in Frances Hesselbein, Marshall Goldsmith, and Richard Beckhard, eds., The Leader of the Future ()
  • Today's concerns about a lack of workers' loyalty to the corporation and a corresponding lack of corporations' loyalty to the work force are sending a clear message to the leaders of tomorrow. The pit bulls of the marketplace may find that their slash-and-crunch and hang-on-till-death philosophies are as dead as the spirits of their troops. In the end, as organizations reduce their work forces, will it be the leader of a dispirited, demoralized work force who leads the pack or will it be the new leader, guiding from vision, principle, and values, who builds trust and releases the energy and creativity of the work force?

    • Frances Hesselbein,
    • in Frances Hesselbein, Marshall Goldsmith, and Richard Beckhard, eds., The Leader of the Future ()

Frances Hesselbein, U.S. leadership consultant, writer

(1918)