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Susan Hale

  • ... love all the people you can. The sufferings from love are not to be compared to the sorrows of loneliness.

    • Susan Hale,
    • letter (1868), in Caroline P. Atkinson, ed., Letters of Susan Hale ()
  • ... the fact that the idea don't come freshly on us makes it necessary for it to be better in order to be good at all. The first rose must have driven the first smeller perfectly wild, but every rose since has smelt just as well.

    • Susan Hale,
    • letter (1868), in Caroline P. Atkinson, ed., Letters of Susan Hale ()
  • Now, in this town, you have to putter over a thing, even the slightest, a month. The powers that evolved the cabbage apple-pie in the morning, and executed it in the evening, are here unknown quantities.

    • Susan Hale,
    • letter (1868), in Caroline P. Atkinson, ed., Letters of Susan Hale ()
  • But I should like to take these things on full gallop, instead of dawdling along gaping at them. I get fearfully tired, and a very little Abbey goes a long way with me.

    • Susan Hale,
    • letter (1868), in Caroline P. Atkinson, ed., Letters of Susan Hale ()
  • Just as I came out into the rue, an omnibus came by — pas complet, so I sprang in, without that prayer and fasting which should chasten the mind before risking it in a French omnibus.

    • Susan Hale,
    • letter (1868), in Caroline P. Atkinson, ed., Letters of Susan Hale ()
  • She has got on to the right side of the baking powder, and her cakes and things are so light they fly down your throat of themselves.

    • Susan Hale,
    • letter (1907), in Caroline P. Atkinson, ed., Letters of Susan Hale ()
  • ... I am an incorrigible devotee to solitude, and am never so cheerful, I believe, or so unruffled by small difficulties as when I'm alone. There's a sort of obligation to be polite and pleasant to yourself when nobody else is round ...

    • Susan Hale,
    • letter (1907), in Caroline P. Atkinson, ed., Letters of Susan Hale ()
  • He got into my mouth along with a pickaxe and telescope, battering-ram and other instruments, and drove a lawn-cutting machine up and down my jaws for a couple of hours. When he came out he said he meant wonderful improvements, and it seems I'm to have a bridge and a mill-wheel and summit and crown of gold, and harps, and Lord knows what, better than new.

    • Susan Hale,
    • letter (1907), in Caroline P. Atkinson, ed., Letters of Susan Hale ()
  • How little we realize things till they come upon us personally. I believe I have been a perfect fiend of indifference, even intolerance, of deaf people, and now it's me. Well, I am determined to become the most Delightful Deaf Old Lady that ever existed and I am practicing to that end ...

    • Susan Hale,
    • letter (1907), in Caroline P. Atkinson, ed., Letters of Susan Hale ()
  • ... I tried the plan of talking incessantly myself, so as to hide the fact I didn't hear anything they said, the result was nobody paid the slightest attention to my (doubtless brilliant) remarks ...

    • Susan Hale,
    • letter (1907), in Caroline P. Atkinson, ed., Letters of Susan Hale ()
  • As for things, how they do accumulate, how often I wish to exclaim, 'Oh don't give me that!'

    • Susan Hale,
    • letter (1909), in Caroline P. Atkinson, ed., Letters of Susan Hale ()
  • Those people of the eighteenth century (Queen Anne's) knew much better what they were about than we do. They had time for things, wrote drooling long letters, had some knowledge of each other's characters, and what books they had, they read. They had a thing called 'Leisure' which we don't possess, although, to be sure, they, even then, regarded themselves as being in a hurry, and spent much time and paper in explaining why they didn't write oftener; the facts being they had nothing to communicate, and as a general thing, wrote much too frequently for comfort either to themselves or their correspondents.

    • Susan Hale,
    • letter (1909), in Caroline P. Atkinson, ed., Letters of Susan Hale ()

Susan Hale, U.S. writer, artist

(1833 - 1910)