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Marcelene Cox

"It is possible to be so busy going on or off a diet that there isn't time left to enjoy life. Once people ate everything set before them, and had the courage to digest it too."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1942)

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"He sharpened his wits on the edge of her nerves."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1942)

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"She was always in good rumor."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1942)

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"She talks with deliberation, as if pressing out a ruffle on each word."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1942)

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"It is never the other woman's dust that annoys, just our own."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1942)

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"Civilization is only the advance from shoeless toes to toeless shoes."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1942)

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"It is a mystery why adults expect perfection from children. Few grownups can get through a whole day without making a mistake."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1943)

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"Eating without conversation is only stoking."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1943)

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"A child who constantly hears 'Don't,' 'Be careful,' 'Stop' will eventually be overtaken by schoolmates, business associates, and rival suitors."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1943)

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"Parenthood: that state of being better chaperoned than you were before marriage."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1944)

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"To some women, housekeeping is like being caught in a revolving door."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1944)

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"Weather means more when you have a garden: there's nothing like listening to a shower and thinking how it is soaking in around your lettuce and green beans."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1944)

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"Children whose problems aren't recognized become problem children."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1944)

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"There are two times in a woman's life when clothes are important: when she is young and when she is old."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1944)

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"A child can never be better than what his parents think of him."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1945)

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"Life is like a camel: you can make it do anything except back up."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1945)

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"Children should not be condemned for accidents. Compared with an adult, the child is all left hand."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1945)

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"Politeness in an individual is as necessary as paint on both sides of a fence, for a person, like a fence, faces out as well as in."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1945)

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"Obstinacy in children is like a kite; it is kept up just as long as we pull against it."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1945)

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"A sparkling house is a fine thing if the children aren't robbed of their luster in keeping it that way."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1945)

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"When a telephone rings, the average man settles deeper into his chair with the observation, 'I wonder who that can be?'"

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1945)

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"He looked as if his mind constantly shifted from one foot to the other."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1945)

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"Three stages in a parent's life: nutrition, dentition, tuition."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1945)

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"It is all right to say exactly what you think if you have learned to think exactly."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1945)

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"It's a wise father that knows his own child--hood."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1945)

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"Raising children is like baking bread: it has to be a slow process or you end up with an overdone crust and an underdone interior."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1945)

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"Heredity: the thing a child gets from the other side of the family."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1946)

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"There are two kinds of people in the world: those who live poor on a lot and those who live rich on a little."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1946)

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"Heredity may be the Cellophane wrapper around a child which environment fails to penetrate."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1946)

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"Adolescence is to life what baking powder is to cake. (And it's better to have too much than too little.)"

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1946)

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"A child does not thrive on what he is prevented from doing, but on what he actually does."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1947)

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"To give children everything is often worse than giving them nothing."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1947)

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"Children always take the line of most persistence."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1947)

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"Piecrust is like a wild animal; when it sees fear in the eyes of its tamer it goes out of control."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1947)

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"Invitation is the sincerest form of flattery."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1948)

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"A day so soft you could wrap a baby in it."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1948)

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"Time: the one thing you take with you."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1948)

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"No one is ever warmed by wool pulled over his eyes."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1948)

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"The illusions of childhood are necessary experiences: a child should not be denied a balloon just because an adult knows that sooner or later it will burst."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1948)

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"When she knew a secret it no longer was."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1948)

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"Why is it that when anything goes without saying, it never does?"

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1948)

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"Too often in ironing out trouble someone gets scorched."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1948)

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"A teen-ager out of sight is like a kite in the clouds; even though you can't see it you feel the tug on the string."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1948)

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"A bachelor is a man who can take a nap on top of a bedspread."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1949)

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"Life begins when a person first realizes how soon it ends."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1949)

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"Growing old is like riding in a train: we seem to sit still while the landscape moves by."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1949)

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"The ultimate mistake in discipline is the ultimatum."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1950)

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"A sense of humor in marriage acts as a lightning rod on a building: grounds the sparks from the air."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1950)

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"Where there's a will there's a way, and where there's a child there's a will."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1950)

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"Our children await Christmas presents like politicians getting in election returns: there's the Uncle Fred precinct and the Aunt Ruth district still to come in."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1950)

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"Youth is stranger than fiction."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1951)

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"All the successful parents I have observed seem to possess one common quality: that of being able to visit with their children."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1952)

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"After you have children, the economic law reverses to Demand and Supply."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1952)

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"A good home is a place where children can do what they like ... but not to somebody else."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1953)

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"To heir is human."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1953)

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"Trouble, like the hill ahead, straightens out when you advance upon it."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1953)

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"An adolescent doesn't always know where he's going; only that he isn't there."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1953)

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"When a person who is fat says it runs in the family, you can be pretty sure the family never did much running."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1953)

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"The mark of a good parent is that he can have fun while being one."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1954)

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"The difficulty between parents and adolescents is not always caused by the fact that parents fail to remember what growing up was like, but that they do."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1954)

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"The test of being a good host is how well the departing guest likes himself."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1954)

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"The way to achieve happiness is to have a high standard for yourself and a medium one for everyone else."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1954)

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"'Under new management' may mean a baby has just been born."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1954)

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"Whenever I try to recall that long-ago first day at school only one memory shines through: my father held my hand."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1954)

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"No man knows his true character until he has run out of gas, purchased something on the installment plan, and raised an adolescent."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1955)

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"Children in a family are like flowers in a bouquet: there's always one determined to face in an opposite direction from the way the arranger desires."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1955)

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"Supplementing an income may mean being more economical with the one you have."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1956)

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"Two important things to teach a child: to do and to do without."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1957)

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"Why is it that the person who needs no introduction usually gets the longest one?"

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1957)

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"When raising rabbits, it doesn't take long to get double your bunny back."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1959)

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"To raise good human beings it is not only necessary to be a good mother and a good father, but to have had a good mother and father."

Marcelene Cox, in Ladies' Home Journal (1959)

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"Parents are often so busy with the physical rearing of children that they miss the glory of parenthood, just as the grandeur of the trees is lost when raking leaves."

Marcelene Cox

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"The girl who marries for money may find herself in debt for life."

Marcelene Cox

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"Money enables a man to get along without an education, and education enables him to get along without money."

Marcelene Cox

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Marcelene Cox, U.S. writer, humorist
(1900 - )

Full name: Marcelene Keister Cox