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Sara Coleridge

"January brings the snow, / Makes our feet and fingers glow. "

Sara Coleridge, "The Months," Pretty Lessons in Verse for Good Children (1843)

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"February brings the rain, / Thaws the frozen lake again."

Sara Coleridge, "The Months," Pretty Lessons in Verse for Good Children (1843)

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"March brings breezes loud and shrill, / Stirs the dancing daffodil."

Sara Coleridge, "The Months," Pretty Lessons in Verse for Good Children (1843)

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"April brings the primrose sweet, / Scatters daisies at our feet."

Sara Coleridge, "The Months," Pretty Lessons in Verse for Good Children (1843)

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"May brings flocks of pretty lambs, / Skipping by their fleecy dams."

Sara Coleridge, "The Months," Pretty Lessons in Verse for Good Children (1843)

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"June brings tulips, lilies, roses, / Fills the children's hands with posies."

Sara Coleridge, "The Months," Pretty Lessons in Verse for Good Children (1843)

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"Hot July brings cooling showers, / Apricots and gilly flowers."

Sara Coleridge, "The Months," Pretty Lessons in Verse for Good Children (1843)

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"Fresh October brings the pheasant, / Then to gather nuts is pleasant."

Sara Coleridge, "The Months," Pretty Lessons in Verse for Good Children (1843)

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"Dull November brings the blast, / Then the leaves are whirling fast."

Sara Coleridge, "The Months," Pretty Lessons in Verse for Good Children (1843)

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"I don't pretend to any exemption from the general lot of parental delusion--I mean that like most other parents I see my child through an atmosphere which illuminates, magnifies, and at the same time refines the object to a degree that amounts to a delusion ... "

Sara Coleridge, 1833, Memoir and Letters, vol. 1 (1873)

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"I would have any one, who really and truly has leisure and ability, make verses. I think it a more refining and happy-making occupation than any other pastime accomplishment."

Sara Coleridge, 1835, Memoir and Letters, vol. 1 (1873)

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"When I read or hear of the mutual injuries of England and Ireland, I fancy it would have been a blessed thing had the sea never flowed between the two countries. Had they been all in one, surely there would have been more unity between them of interests and of feelings. But let us hope that days of peace and general enlightenment will arrive by ways past man's finding out."

Sara Coleridge, 1835, Memoir and Letters, vol. 1 (1873)

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"Some people go on day after day and month after month pursuing a method, which day after day and month after month they find invariably to fail, without once saying to themselves, 'Since this plan works so ill, is it, or is it not, the least bad that can be imagined?' "

Sara Coleridge, 1835, Memoir and Letters, vol. 1 (1873)

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"Puns are often unacceptable to the feelings; they come like a spoonful of ice-cream in the midst of a comfortable smoking-hot steak, or as a peppery morsel when your palate was in expectation of a mild pudding."

Sara Coleridge, 1835, Memoir and Letters, vol. 1 (1873)

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"Life is the steam of the corporeal engine; the soul is the engineer who makes use of the steam-quickened engine."

Sara Coleridge, 1836, Memoir and Letters, vol. 1 (1873)

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"I very much wish that some day or other you may have time to learn Greek, because that language is an idea. Even a little of it is like manure to the soil of the mind, and makes it bear finer flowers."

Sara Coleridge, 1836, Memoir and Letters, vol. 1 (1873)

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"Religious bigotry is a dull fire -- hot enough to roast an ox, but with no lambent, luminous flame shooting up from it."

Sara Coleridge, 1842, Memoir and Letters, vol. 1 (1873)

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"The death of my mother permanently affects my happiness, more even than I should have anticipated, though I always knew that I must feel the separation at first as a severe wrench. But I did not apprehend, during her life, to what a degree she prevented me from feeling heart-solitude ... "

Sara Coleridge, 1845, Memoir and Letters, vol. 1 (1873)

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"We always feel some difficulty in addressing those whom we are not in the habit of addressing frequently; we feel that the letter which is to make up for long silence, and epitomize the goings on of a good many months, ought to be three times as kind, satisfactory, and newsful as if two others had preceded it. And being at the same time quite sure that this very circumstance will tend to freeze the genial current of our thoughts, and that occurrences which might have had some savor in them, if told when fresh, are now grown vapid, we are apt to look on the matter as a sort of task, something we would wish to perform better than we have any chance of doing; and this feeling is the stronger the more we desire to stand well with the letter-expectant. Letters that come seldom can not do without preambles; which are always stupid things, but sometimes seem necessary to prevent the appearance of abruptness."

Sara Coleridge, 1837, Memoir and Letters, vol. 1 (1873)

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"Parents and children cannot be to each other, as husbands with wives and wives with husbands. Nature has separated them by an almost impassable barrier of time; the mind and the heart are in quite a different state at fifteen and forty."

Sara Coleridge, 1846, Memoir and Letters, vol. 2 (1873)

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"... bubbles of false opinion will last whole ages, and deceive whole generations, till they are broken by some powerful breath, and even then how often they reunite, and again shine in the eyes of men, who hold them solid as cannon-balls!"

Sara Coleridge, 1847, Memoir and Letters, vol. 2 (1873)

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"... avarice is especially, I suppose, a disease of the imagination."

Sara Coleridge, 1848, Memoir and Letters, vol. 2 (1873)

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"Much waste of words and of thought too would be avoided if disputants would always begin with a clear statement of the question, and not proceed to argue till they had agreed upon what it was that they were arguing about."

Sara Coleridge, 1848, Memoir and Letters, vol. 2 (1873)

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"The desire to be the object of public attention is weak, but the excessive dread of it is but a form of vanity and over-self-contemplativeness."

Sara Coleridge, 1849, Memoir and Letters, vol. 2 (1873)

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"...there is nothing so uncertain and slippery as fact."

Sara Coleridge, 1849, Memoir and Letters, vol. 2 (1873)

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"It is remarkable what fine hands men of genius write, even when they are as awkward in all other uses of the hand as a cow with a musket."

Sara Coleridge, 1850, Memoir and Letters, vol. 2 (1873)

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"I have a strong opinion that a genuine love of books is one of the greatest blessings of life for man and woman ... "

Sara Coleridge, 1840, in Ada M. Ingpen, ed., Women As Letter-Writers (1909)

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Sara Coleridge, English writer, translator
(1802 - 1852)