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Mary-Lou Weisman

  • The mature, forty-five-year-old woman, quite experienced in matters of life and death, knows that it was 'for the best,' but Daddy's girl, who hung onto his belt and danced fox trots on the tops of his shoes, cannot accept that Daddy is not here anymore.

    • Mary-Lou Weisman,
    • in Nancy R. Newhouse, ed., Hers: Through Women's Eyes ()
  • All too often, when people don't know where they are, have jet lag, don't speak the language, and can't figure out the money or maintain intestinal regularity, they get hostile.

  • Perhaps for totemic reasons, people like to possess a piece of the country they are visiting. Women like to wear it. Men like to eat it.

  • Having traveled initially to get away, ultimately we travel to come home.

  • ... I have been in Paris for almost a week and I have not heard anyone say calories, or cholesterol, or even arterial plaque. The French do not season their food with regret.

  • It is not possible to rent a beach house within five hours' drive of one's hometown without being visited by people. This is especially true if I have actually invited them. One of my problems is that I like to be nicer than I actually am.

  • I mean well, at least initially. I miss my friends. I want to see you. I want to show you this darling cottage and share all the fun we're having. Then, after about an hour, I want you to go home.

Mary-Lou Weisman, U.S. writer, journalist

(1937)