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Eugénie de Guérin

  • How long time is when one is sad! Is it three years or three days since you went away ... ?

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1831), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • Yesterday, at Andillac, a little child went to heaven. If I were a little child I should like to follow it, but when one gets old, if one could help it, one would never die. Then it is that the threads that once attached us to earth become cables.

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1831), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • Witticisms are fire-arms, that make a noise and give pain ...

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1833), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • If and but, life's great impediments!

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1834), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • One has so much time for thought in the country! However occupied one may be, 'tis with nothing that engrosses the mind, which works away on its own account like a mill-wheel.

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1835), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • The errors of the intellect are fatal, still more dangerous than those of the heart.

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1835), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • A little time separates us from those who depart — a time of tears, a time of sadness and solitude; but, that over, we go to rejoin them and to enjoy with them the society of the blessed. Oh, how sweetly the heart rests in this immortal hope!

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1835), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • To lose a sister, to see her no more, live with her no more, my poor friend, oh! I can well believe you are desolate.

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1837), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • ... in God alone is love without tears, and of eternal duration.

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1837), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • Oh! if people were but acquainted with piety, they would not fear it so much, or give it so unattractive a character; 'tis the balm of life, and perhaps in the world it is believed to consist of bitterness, harshness, uncouthness; but, take my word for it, nothing is more gentle, more yielding, more loving than a pious soul.

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1838), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • Fear is the beginning of wisdom.

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1838), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • We have traversed Paris in every direction, have taken daily walks of three and four hours, and that without my feeling any fatigue, without even remembering that I was walking. One has no body, one has only a soul to see and admire.

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1838), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • Kings may see their palaces fall, but the ants will always have their dwellings.

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1838), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • We all owe each other concessions of taste and opinion for the sake of family peace and affection ...

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1838), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • Prejudices are so powerful!

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1839), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • Distance only separates bodies, and that, alas! is quite enough.

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1839), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • My God, how badly one calculates in this world! ... Let us leave off calculating on anything but death — it is the only certainty.

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1839), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • I am sixty years old, and yet I still find myself young.

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1839), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • ... I have a rage for being useful, for devoting myself to somebody or something.

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1840), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • One fancies that what one loves cannot die.

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1840), in Guillaume S. TTrébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • We are only here below as in an inn on a journey. Let us, then have the feelings of travelers. We should think a man very strange who attached himself much to his inn. The wise Christian will not do this.

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1840), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • O! if there were a continuance of days like this, the dead would arise out of their graves; the air has resurrection in it.

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1841), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • Poets never die — nor friends either, I assure you, monsieur. Neither death nor silence in reality changes the soul.

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1841), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • Certainly, friends are sufficiently rare not to be neglected; they are life's best comforters.

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1843), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • To meet in imagination is pretty much like dining in imagination, and I like the one as little as the other. I intend, therefore, to come and see you in good earnest ...

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • letter (1843), in Guillaume S. Trébutien, ed., Letters of Eugénie de Guérin ()
  • Solitude causes us to write because it causes us to think.

    • Eugénie de Guérin,
    • in J. De Finod, ed., A Thousand Flashes of French Wit, Wisdom, and Wickedness ()

Eugénie de Guérin, French writer, poet

(1805 - 1848)