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Margaret Prescott Montague

  • Once out of all the gray days of my life I have looked into the heart of reality; I have witnessed the truth; I have seen life as it really is — ravishingly, ecstatically, madly beautiful, and filled to overflowing with a wild joy, and a value unspeakable.

    • Margaret Prescott Montague,
    • in The Atlantic Monthly ()
  • Convalescence is a sort of grown-up rebirth, enabling us to see life with a fresh eye.

    • Margaret Prescott Montague,
    • in The Atlantic Monthly ()
  • Doubtless almost any intense emotion may open our 'inward eye' to the beauty of reality. Falling in love appears to do it for some people. The beauties of nature or the exhilaration of artistic creation does it for others. Probably any high experience may momentarily stretch our souls up on tiptoe, so that we catch a glimpse of that marvelous beauty which is always there, but which we are not often tall enough to perceive.

    • Margaret Prescott Montague,
    • in The Atlantic Monthly ()
  • ... to transpose the quotation ... 'I had slept and dreamed that life was duty, / But waked to find that life was beauty.'

    • Margaret Prescott Montague,
    • in The Atlantic Monthly ()
  • ... the beauty is forever there before us, forever piping to us, and we are forever failing to dance. We could not help but dance if we could see things as they really are. Then we should kiss both hands to Fate and fling our bodies, hearts, minds, and souls into life with a glorious abandonment, an extravagant, delighted loyalty, knowing that our wildest enthusiasm cannot more than brush the hem of the real beauty and joy and wonder that are always there.

    • Margaret Prescott Montague,
    • in The Atlantic Monthly ()

Margaret Prescott Montague, U.S. writer

(1878 - 1955)