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Zelda Fitzgerald

"Looking for love is like asking for a new point of departure ... another chance in life."

Zelda Fitzgerald, Save Me the Waltz (1932)

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"... Millie Beggs, by the time she was forty-five, had become an emotional anarchist."

Zelda Fitzgerald, Save Me the Waltz (1932)

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"But I warn you ... I am only really myself when I'm somebody else whom I have endowed with these wonderful qualities from my imagination."

Zelda Fitzgerald, Save Me the Waltz (1932)

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"Anything incomprehensible has a sexual significance to many people under thirty-five."

Zelda Fitzgerald, Save Me the Waltz (1932)

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"Every time I try to talk to the cook, she scuttles down the cellar stairs and adds a hundred francs to the bill."

Zelda Fitzgerald, Save Me the Waltz (1932)

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"You took what you wanted from life, if you could get it, and you did without the rest."

Zelda Fitzgerald, Save Me the Waltz (1932)

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"We get something to do and as soon as we've got it, it gets us."

Zelda Fitzgerald, Save Me the Waltz (1932)

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"By the time a person has achieved years adequate for choosing a direction, the die is cast and the moment has long since passed which determined the future."

Zelda Fitzgerald, Save Me the Waltz (1932)

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"We grew up founding our dreams on the infinite promise of American advertising. I still believe that one can learn to play the piano by mail and that mud will give you a perfect complexion."

Zelda Fitzgerald, Save Me the Waltz (1932)

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"... I don't want to live -- I want to love first, and live incidentally ..."

Zelda Fitzgerald, letter (1919), in Nancy Milford, Zelda (1970)

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"Nothing annoys me more than having the most trivial action analyzed and explained."

Zelda Fitzgerald, 1919, in Nancy Milford, Zelda (1970)

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"It's terrible to allow conventional habits to gain a hold on a whole household; to eat, sleep and live by clock ticks."

Zelda Fitzgerald, 1923, in Nancy Milford, Zelda (1970)

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"There's nothing on earth to do here but look at the view and eat. You can imagine the result since I do not like to look at views."

Zelda Fitzgerald, letter to her daughter (1927), in Nancy Milford, Zelda (1970)

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"I can't read or sleep. Without hope or youth or money I sit constantly wishing I were dead."

Zelda Fitzgerald, letter to Scott Fitzgerald (1930), in Nancy Milford, Zelda (1970)

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"One illusion is as good as another."

Zelda Fitzgerald, letter to Scott Fitzgerald (1930), in Nancy Milford, Zelda (1970)

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"I take a sun bath and listen to the hours, formulating, and disintegrating under the pines, and smell the resiny hardihood of the high noon hours. The world is lost in a blue haze of distances, and the immediate sleeps in a thin and finite sun."

Zelda Fitzgerald, 1938, in Nancy Milford, Zelda (1970)

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"The purpose of life on earth is that the soul should grow -- So grow! By doing what is right."

Zelda Fitzgerald, letter (1944), in Nancy Milford, Zelda (1970)

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"Nobody has ever measured, even the poets, how much a heart can hold."

Zelda Fitzgerald, 1945, in Nancy Milford, Zelda (1970)

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"[On her husband's use of material from her diary and letters:] Mr. Fitzgerald -- I believe that is how he spells his name -- seems to believe that plagiarism begins at home."

Zelda Fitzgerald, "Mrs. F. Scott Fitzgerald Reviews The Beautiful and Damned, Former Husband's Latest," New York Tribune (1922)

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"It is the loose ends with which men hang themselves."

Zelda Fitzgerald, in The Atlantic Monthly (1951)

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"Pronunciation has made many an innocent word sound like a doctor's orders for a stomach pump ..."

Zelda Fitzgerald, "Scandalabra" (1932), in Matthew J. Bruccoli, ed., Zelda Fitzgerald: The Collected Writings (1991)

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"Connie thinks monogamy is what the parlor chairs were made of in the Nineties."

Zelda Fitzgerald, "Scandalabra" (1932), in Matthew J. Bruccoli, ed., Zelda Fitzgerald: The Collected Writings (1991)

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"Experience teaches you how to do things you never want to do again."

Zelda Fitzgerald, "Scandalabra" (1932), in Matthew J. Bruccoli, ed., Zelda Fitzgerald: The Collected Writings (1991)

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"Maybe other people's ideas of us are truer than our own."

Zelda Fitzgerald, "Scandalabra" (1932), in Matthew J. Bruccoli, ed., Zelda Fitzgerald: The Collected Writings (1991)

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"Other people's ideas of us are dependent largely on what they've hoped for."

Zelda Fitzgerald, "Scandalabra" (1932), in Matthew J. Bruccoli, ed., Zelda Fitzgerald: The Collected Writings (1991)

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"Nobody has ever been able to experience what they have thoroughly understood -- or understand what they have experienced until they have achieved a detachment that renders them incapable of repeating the experience."

Zelda Fitzgerald, 1932, in Matthew J. Bruccoli, ed., Zelda Fitzgerald: The Collected Writings (1991)

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"Living is cold and technical without you, a death mask of itself. ... All afternoon I've been writing soggy words in the rain and feeling dank inside, and thinking of you. When a person crosses your high forehead and slides down into the pleasant valleys about your dear mouth it's like Hannibal crossing the Alps."

Zelda Fitzgerald, letter to F. Scott Fitzgerald (1930), in Jackson R. Bryer and Cathy W. Barks, eds., Dear Scott, Dearest Zelda (2003)

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"It seemed very sad to see you going off in your new shoes alone."

Zelda Fitzgerald, letter to F. Scott Fitzgerald (1932), in Jackson R. Bryer and Cathy W. Barks, eds., Dear Scott, Dearest Zelda (2003)

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Zelda Fitzgerald, U.S. writer, literary figure
(1900 - 1948)

Full name: Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald.