famous quotes

Welcome to the web´s most comprehensive site of quotations by women. Over 40,000 quotations are searchable by topic, by author's name, or by keyword. Many of them appear in no other collection. And new ones are added continually.

See all TOPICS available:

See all AUTHORS available:

Search by topic:

Find quotations by TOPIC (coffee, love, dogs)
or search alphabetically below.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Search by last name:

Search by keyword:

M.F.K. Fisher

"... a potato is a poor thing, poorly treated. More often than not it is cooked in so unthinking and ignorant a manner as to make one feel that it has never before been encountered in the kitchen ..."

M.F.K. Fisher, Serve It Forth (1937)

New Quoatation

"The oyster leads a dreadful but exciting life. Indeed, his chance to live at all is slim, and if he should survive the arrows of his own outrageous fortune and in the two weeks of his carefree youth find a clean smooth place to fix on, the years afterwards are full of stress, passion, and danger."

M.F.K. Fisher, Consider the Oyster (1941)

New Quoatation

"Almost any normal oyster never knows from one year to the next whether he is he or she, and may start at any moment, after the first year, to lay eggs where before he spent his sexual energies in being exceptionally masculine."

M.F.K. Fisher, Consider the Oyster (1941)

New Quoatation

"On the other hand, a flaccid, moping, debauched mollusc, tired from too much love and loose-nerved from general world conditions, can be a shameful thing served raw upon the shell."

M.F.K. Fisher, Consider the Oyster (1941)

New Quoatation

"When I write of hunger, I am really writing about love and the hunger for it, and warmth and the love of it and the hunger for it ... and then the warmth and richness and fine reality of hunger satisfied ... and it is all one. "

M.F.K. Fisher, The Gastronomical Me (1943)

New Quoatation

"There is a communion of more than our bodies when bread is broken and wine drunk. And that is my answer, when people ask me: Why do you write about hunger, and not wars or love?"

M.F.K. Fisher, The Gastronomical Me (1943)

New Quoatation

"It should always be seen, the first time, with the eyes of childhood or of love."

M.F.K. Fisher, on Paris, The Gastronomical Me (1943)

New Quoatation

"... hate seemed to crackle out of him in little flashes, like electricity in a cat's fur."

M.F.K. Fisher, The Gastronomical Me (1943)

New Quoatation

"... slugs are things from the edges of insanity ..."

M.F.K. Fisher, Serve It Forth (1937)

New Quoatation

"Too few of us, perhaps, feel that the breaking of bread, the sharing of salt, the common dipping into one bowl, mean more than satisfaction of a need. We make such primal things as casual as tunes heard over a radio, forgetting the mystery and strength in both. "

M.F.K. Fisher, Serve It Forth (1937)

New Quoatation

"Sharing our meals should be a joyful and a trustful act, rather than the cursory fulfillment of our social obligations."

M.F.K. Fisher, Serve It Forth (1937)

New Quoatation

"I prefer not to have among my guests two people or more, of any sex, who are in the first wild tremors of love. It is better to invite them after their new passion has settled, has solidified into a quieter reciprocity of emotions. (It is also a waste of good food, to serve it to new lovers.)"

M.F.K. Fisher, Serve It Forth (1937)

New Quoatation

"... France eats more conciously, more intelligently, than any other nation."

M.F.K. Fisher, Serve It Forth (1937)

New Quoatation

"It is not strange, of course, that the act of cutting meat should be invested with much significance and pomp: from the time of the first stone knives, the first raw or roasted carcasses, it is the man of skill and virile prowess who has been the one to dole out what meat was mete for his dependents. But the art of carving is one that, when learned at all, must be practiced faithfully, and few families now have either the ovens or the appetites (given the incomes) for haunches and hams big enough to work on. My father is one of four or five men I know who still make a little show, a kind of precise ballet, of carving, and since our family has shrunk with the passage of time and peace and war he has few chances in a year to stand up to a bird or a great roast of beef. When he does, it is a noble performance, and one that rightly should be done to the sound of trumpets."

M.F.K. Fisher, in Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, The Physiology of Taste (1949)

New Quoatation

"... death ... so seldom happens nowadays in the awesome quiet of a familiar chamber. Most of us die violently, thanks to the advance of science and warfare. If by chance we are meant to end life in our beds, we are whisked like pox victims to the nearest hospital, where we are kept as alone and unaware as possible of the approach of disintegration."

M.F.K. Fisher, in Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, The Physiology of Taste (1949)

New Quoatation

"Brioches are a light, pale yellow, faintly sweet kind of muffin with a characteristic blob on top, rather like a mushroom just pushing crookedly through the ground. Once eaten in Paris, they never taste as good anywhere else."

M.F.K. Fisher, in Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, The Physiology of Taste (1949)

New Quoatation

"... sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly."

M.F.K. Fisher, An Alphabet for Gourmets (1949)

New Quoatation

"A complete lack of caution is perhaps one of the true signs of a real gourmet ..."

M.F.K. Fisher, An Alphabet for Gourmets (1949)

New Quoatation

"The cold truth is that family dinners are more often than not an ordeal of nervous indigestion, preceded by hidden resentment and ennui and accompanied by psychosomatic jitters."

M.F.K. Fisher, An Alphabet for Gourmets (1949)

New Quoatation

"In spite of my conviction that a group of deliberately assembled relatives can be one of the dullest, if not most dangerous, gatherings in the world, I am smugly foolhardly enough to have invited all my available family, more than once, to dine with me."

M.F.K. Fisher, An Alphabet for Gourmets (1949)

New Quoatation

"It must not simply be taken for granted that a given set of ill-assorted people, for no other reason than because it is Christmas, will be joyful to be reunited and to break bread together."

M.F.K. Fisher, An Alphabet for Gourmets (1949)

New Quoatation

"... gastronomy is and always has been connected with its sister art of love."

M.F.K. Fisher, An Alphabet for Gourmets (1949)

New Quoatation

"Probably no strychnine has sent as many husbands into their graves as mealtime scolding has, and nothing has driven more men into the arms of other women than the sound of a shrill whine at table."

M.F.K. Fisher, An Alphabet for Gourmets (1949)

New Quoatation

"... gastronomical perfection can be reached in these combinations: one person dining alone, usually upon a couch or a hill side; two people, of no matter what sex or age, dining in a good restaurant; six people, of no matter what sex or age, dining in a good home."

M.F.K. Fisher, An Alphabet for Gourmets (1949)

New Quoatation

"Probably one of the most private things in the world is an egg until it is broken."

M.F.K. Fisher, How to Cook a Wolf (1951)

New Quoatation

"... there can be no more shameless carelessness than with the food we eat for life itself."

M.F.K. Fisher, How to Cook a Wolf (1951)

New Quoatation

"Probably the most satisfying soup in the world for people who are hungry, as well as for those who are tired or worried or cross or in debt or in a moderate amount of pain or in love or in robust health or in any kind of business huggermuggery, is minestrone."

M.F.K. Fisher, How to Cook a Wolf (1951)

New Quoatation

"... since we must eat to live, we might as well do it with both grace and gusto."

M.F.K. Fisher, How to Cook a Wolf (1951)

New Quoatation

"I notice that as I get rid of the protective covering of the middle years, I am more openly amused and incautious and less careful socially, and that all this makes for increasingly pleasant contacts with the world."

M.F.K. Fisher, Sister Age (1983)

New Quoatation

" ... old age is more bearable if it can be helped by an early acceptance of being loved and of loving. "

M.F.K. Fisher, Sister Age (1983)

New Quoatation

"It is hard and perhaps impossible for many people to recognize the difference between innocence and naiveté."

M.F.K. Fisher, Long Ago in France (1991)

New Quoatation

"It was there [Dijon], I now understand, that I started to grow up, to study, to make love, to eat and drink, to be me and not what I was expected to be. It was there that I learned it is blessed to receive, as well as that every human being, no matter how base, is worthy of my respect and even my envy because he knows something that I may never be old or wise or kind or tender enough to know."

M.F.K. Fisher, Long Ago in France (1991)

New Quoatation

"I wrote like a junkie. I had to have my daily fix."

M.F.K. Fisher, in Mickey Pearlman and Katherine Usher Henderson, A Voice of One\'s Own (1992)

New Quoatation

"It seems to me that our three basic needs, for food and security and love, are so mixed and mingled and entwined that we cannot straightly think of one without the others."

M.F.K. Fisher, in Norah K. Barr, Marsha Moran, Patrick Moran, eds., M.F.K. Fisher: A Life in Letters (1997)

New Quoatation

"And like you, I remain as always strikingly beautiful, even though nobody knows it but me."

M.F.K. Fisher, in Norah K. Barr, Marsha Moran, Patrick Moran, eds., M.F.K. Fisher: A Life in Letters (1997)

New Quoatation

"... I think we grieve forever, but that goes for love too, fortunately for us all."

M.F.K. Fisher, in Norah K. Barr, Marsha Moran, Patrick Moran, eds., M.F.K. Fisher: A Life in Letters (1997)

New Quoatation

"Time turtles on."

M.F.K. Fisher

New Quoatation

"... cooks must feed their egos as well as their customers ..."

M.F.K. Fisher, in Norah K. Barr, Marsha Moran, Patrick Moran, eds., M.F.K. Fisher: A Life in Letters (1997)

New Quoatation

"... I honestly believe that everything I know about the writing of non-fiction (or writing) could be engraved on the head of a pin with a garden hoe ..."

M.F.K. Fisher, in Norah K. Barr, Marsha Moran, Patrick Moran, eds., M.F.K. Fisher: A Life in Letters (1997)

New Quoatation

"Hunger is more than a problem of belly and guts, and ... the satisfying of it can and must and does nourish the spirit as well as the body."

M.F.K. Fisher

New Quoatation

"The smell of good bread baking, like the sound of lightly flowing water, is indescribable in its evocation of innocence and delight."

M.F.K. Fisher

New Quoatation

"Dining partners, regardless of gender, social standing, or the years they've lived, should be chosen for their ability to eat -- and drink! -- with the right mixture of abandon and restraint. They should enjoy food, and look upon its preparation and its degustation as one of the human arts."

M.F.K. Fisher, Serve It Forth (1937)

New Quoatation

M.F.K. Fisher, U.S. food writer
(1908 - 1992)

Full name: Mary Frances Kennedy Fisher Parrish Friede