famous quotes

Welcome to the web´s most comprehensive site of quotations by women. Over 40,000 quotations are searchable by topic, by author's name, or by keyword. Many of them appear in no other collection. And new ones are added continually.

See all TOPICS available:

See all AUTHORS available:

Search by topic:

Find quotations by TOPIC (coffee, love, dogs)
or search alphabetically below.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Search by last name:

Search by keyword:

Agnes Repplier

"... in the stress of modern life, how little room is left for that most comfortable vanity which whispers in our ears that failures are not faults!"

Agnes Repplier, "On the Benefits of Superstition," Books and Men (1888)

New Quoatation

"By providing cheap and wholesome reading for the young, we have partly succeeded in driving from the field that which was positively bad; yet nothing is easier than to overdo a reformation, and, through the characteristic indulgence of American parents, children are drugged with a literature whose chief merit is its harmlessness."

Agnes Repplier, "What Children Read," Books and Men (1888)

New Quoatation

"Books that children read but once are of scant service to them; those that have really helped to warm our imaginations and to train our faculties are the few old friends we know so well that they have become a portion of our thinking selves."

Agnes Repplier, "What Children Read," Books and Men (1888)

New Quoatation

"People fed on sugared praises cannot be expected to feel an appetite for the black broth of honest criticism."

Agnes Repplier, "Curiosities of Criticism," Books and Men (1888)

New Quoatation

"... the labors of the true critic are more essential to the author, even, than to the reader."

Agnes Repplier, "Curiosities of Criticism," Books and Men (1888)

New Quoatation

"... the critical power, though on a distinctly lower level than the creative, is of inestimable help in its development."

Agnes Repplier, "Curiosities of Criticism," Books and Men (1888)

New Quoatation

"... self-satisfaction, if as buoyant as gas, has an ugly trick of collapsing when full-blown ... "

Agnes Repplier, "Some Aspects of Pessimism," Books and Men (1888)

New Quoatation

"Now the pessimist proper is the most modest of men. ... under no circumstances does he presume to imagine that he, a mere unit of pain, can in any degree change or soften the remorseless words of fate."

Agnes Repplier, "Some Aspects of Pessimism," Books and Men (1888)

New Quoatation

"The pessimist, however, -- be it recorded to his credit, -- is seldom an agitating individual. His creed breeds indifference to others, and he does not trouble himself to thrust his views upon the unconvinced."

Agnes Repplier, "Some Aspects of Pessimism," Books and Men (1888)

New Quoatation

"Memory cheats us no less than hope by hazing over those things that we would fain forget; but who that has plodded on to middle age would take back upon his shoulders ten of the vanished years, with their mingled pleasures and pains? Who would return to the youth he is forever pretending to regret?"

Agnes Repplier, "Some Aspects of Pessimism," Books and Men (1888)

New Quoatation

"... there is always a secret irritation about a laugh in which we cannot join."

Agnes Repplier, "A Plea for Humor," Points of View (1891)

New Quoatation

"... if a man be discreet enough to take to hard drinking in his youth, before his general emptiness is ascertained, his friends invariably credit him with a host of shining qualities which, we are given to understand, lie balked and frustrated by his one unfortunate weakness."

Agnes Repplier, "A Plea for Humor," Points of View (1891)

New Quoatation

"... humor distorts nothing, and only false gods are laughed off their earthly pedestals. "

Agnes Repplier, "A Plea for Humor," Points of View (1891)

New Quoatation

"Erudition, like a bloodhound, is a charming thing when held firmly in leash, but it is not so attractive when turned loose upon a defenseless and unerudite public."

Agnes Repplier, "Books That Have Hindered Me," Points of View (1891)

New Quoatation

"There is something frightful in being required to enjoy and appreciate all masterpieces; to read with equal relish Milton, and Dante, and Calderon, and Goethe, and Homer, and Scott, and Voltaire, and Wordsworth, and Cervantes, and Molière, and Swift."

Agnes Repplier, "Literary Shibboleths," Points of View (1891)

New Quoatation

"... too much rigidity on the part of teachers should be followed by a brisk spirit of insubordination on the part of the taught."

Agnes Repplier, "Literary Shibboleths," Points of View (1891)

New Quoatation

"It is not the office of a novelist to show us how to behave ourselves; it is not the business of fiction to teach us anything."

Agnes Repplier, "Fiction in the Pulpit," Points of View (1891)

New Quoatation

"Art is never didactic, does not take kindly to facts, is helpless to grapple with theories, and is killed outright by a sermon."

Agnes Repplier, "Fiction in the Pulpit," Points of View (1891)

New Quoatation

"While art may instruct as well as please, it can nevertheless be true art without instructing, but not without pleasing."

Agnes Repplier, "Pleasure: A Heresy," Points of View (1891)

New Quoatation

"The least practical of us have some petty thrift dear to our hearts, some one direction in which we love to scrimp."

Agnes Repplier, "Esoteric Economy," Points of View (1891)

New Quoatation

"Everybody is now so busy teaching that nobody has any time to learn."

Agnes Repplier, "Mr. Wilde's Intentions," Essays in Miniature (1892)

New Quoatation

"Those persons are happiest in this restless and mutable world who are in love with change, who delight in what is new simply because it differs from what is old; who rejoice in every innovation, and find a strange alert pleasure in all that is, and that has never been before."

Agnes Repplier, "The Charm of the Familiar," Essays in Miniature (1892)

New Quoatation

"For my part, the good novel of character is the novel I can always pick up; but the good novel of incident is the novel I can never lay down."

Agnes Repplier, "The Novel of Incident," Essays in Miniature (1892)

New Quoatation

"A man who owns a dog is, in every sense of the word, its master; the term expresses accurately their mutual relations. But it is ridiculous when applied to the limited possession of a cat."

Agnes Repplier, "Agrippina," Essays in Idleness (1893)

New Quoatation

"This is the sphinx of the hearthstone, the little god of domesticity, whose presence turns a house into a home."

Agnes Repplier, "Agrippina," Essays in Idleness (1893)

New Quoatation

"... the most charming thing about youth is the tenacity of its impressions."

Agnes Repplier, "The Children's Poets," Essays in Idleness (1893)

New Quoatation

"It is in his pleasures that a man really lives, it is from his leisure that he constructs the true fabric of self."

Agnes Repplier, "Leisure," Essays in Idleness (1893)

New Quoatation

"An appreciation of words is so rare that everybody naturally thinks he possesses it, and this universal sentiment results in the misuse of a material whose beauty enriches the loving student beyond the dreams of avarice."

Agnes Repplier, "Words," Essays in Idleness (1893)

New Quoatation

"People with theories of life are, perhaps, the most relentless of their kind, for no time or place is sacred from their devastating elucidations."

Agnes Repplier, "Ennui," Essays in Idleness (1893)

New Quoatation

"[On Eve and Adam:] ... conversation between these two must have been difficult at times, because they had nobody to talk about."

Agnes Repplier, "Ennui," Essays in Idleness (1893)

New Quoatation

"Wit is artificial; humor is natural. Wit is accidental; humor is inevitable. Wit is born of conscious effort; humor, of the allotted ironies of fate. Wit can be expressed only in language; humor can be developed sufficiently in situation."

Agnes Repplier, "Wit and Humor," Essays in Idleness (1893)

New Quoatation

"Wit is the salt of conversation, not the food, and few things in the world are more wearying than a sarcastic attitude towards life."

Agnes Repplier, "Wit and Humor," Essays in Idleness (1893)

New Quoatation

"... real letter-writing ... is founded on a need as old and as young as humanity itself, the need that one human being has of another."

Agnes Repplier, "Letters," Essays in Idleness (1893)

New Quoatation

"A puppy is but a dog, plus high spirits, and minus common sense."

Agnes Repplier, "A Kitten," In the Dozy Hours (1894)

New Quoatation

"Humor, in one form or another, is characteristic of every nation; and reflecting the salient points of social and national life, it illuminates those crowded corners which history leaves obscure."

Agnes Repplier, "Humor: English and American," In the Dozy Hours (1894)

New Quoatation

"The necessity of knowing a little about a great many things is the most grievous burden of our day. It deprives us of leisure on the one hand, and of scholarship on the other."

Agnes Repplier, "Lectures," In the Dozy Hours (1894)

New Quoatation

"There is a secret and wholesome conviction in the heart of every man or woman who has written a book that it should be no easy matter for an intelligent reader to lay down that book unfinished. There is a pardonable impression among reviewers that half an hour in its company is sufficient."

Agnes Repplier, "Reviewers and Reviewed," In the Dozy Hours (1894)

New Quoatation

"Guests are the delight of leisure, and the solace of ennui."

Agnes Repplier, "Guests," In the Dozy Hours (1894)

New Quoatation

"It is the steady and merciless increase of occupations, the augmented speed at which we are always trying to live, the crowding of each day with more work and amusement than it can profitably hold, which has cost us, among other good things, the undisturbed enjoyment of friends. Friendship takes time, and we have no time to give it."

Agnes Repplier, "Guests," In the Dozy Hours (1894)

New Quoatation

"There are few things more wearisome in a fairly fatiguing life than the monotonous repetition of a phrase which catches and holds the public fancy by virtue of its total lack of significance."

Agnes Repplier, "The Eternal Feminine," Varia (1897)

New Quoatation

"For indeed all that we think so new to-day has been acted over and over again, a shifting comedy, by the women of every century."

Agnes Repplier, "The Eternal Feminine," Varia (1897)

New Quoatation

"Diaries tell their little tales with a directness, a candor, conscious or unconscious, a closeness of outlook, which gratifies our sense of security. Reading them is like gazing through a small clear pane of glass. We may not see far and wide, but we see very distinctly that which comes within our field of vision."

Agnes Repplier, "The Deathless Diary," Varia (1897)

New Quoatation

"In those happy days when leisure was held to be no sin, men and women wrote journals whose copiousness both delights and dismays us."

Agnes Repplier, "The Deathless Diary," Varia (1897)

New Quoatation

"... it is not every tourist who bubbles over with mirth, and that unquenchable spirit of humor which turns a trial into a blessing."

Agnes Repplier, "Guides: A Protest," Varia (1897)

New Quoatation

"The earliest voice listened to by the nations in their infancy was the voice of the storyteller."

Agnes Repplier, "The Royal Road of Fiction," Varia (1897)

New Quoatation

"Personally, I do not believe that it is the duty of any man or woman to write a novel. In nine cases out of ten, there would be greater merit in leaving it unwritten."

Agnes Repplier, "From the Reader's Standpoint," Varia (1897)

New Quoatation

"Necessity knows no Sunday."

Agnes Repplier, Philadelphia: The Place and the People (1898)

New Quoatation

"... there is nothing so lowering to one's self-esteem as the affectionate contempt of a beloved cat."

Agnes Repplier, The Fireside Sphinx (1901)

New Quoatation

"... whereas the dog strives to lessen the distance between himself and man, seeks ever to be intelligent and intelligible, and translates into looks and actions the words he cannot speak, the cat dwells within the circle of her own secret thoughts."

Agnes Repplier, The Fireside Sphinx (1901)

New Quoatation

"The dog is guided by kindly instinct to the man or woman whose heart is open to his advances. The cat often leaves the friend who courts her, to honor, or to harass, the unfortunate mortal who shudders at her unwelcome caresses."

Agnes Repplier, The Fireside Sphinx (1901)

New Quoatation

"Cats, even when robust, have scant liking for the boisterous society of children, and are apt to exert their utmost ingenuity to escape it. Nor are they without adult sympathy in their prejudice."

Agnes Repplier, The Fireside Sphinx (1901)

New Quoatation

"Letters form a by-path of literature, a charming, but occasional, retreat for people of cultivated leisure."

Agnes Repplier, "The Luxury of Conversation," Compromises (1904)

New Quoatation

"Conversation in its happiest development is a link, equally exquisite and adequate, between mind and mind, a system by which men approach one another with sympathy and enjoyment, a field for the finest amenities of civilization, for the keenest and most intelligent display of social activity. It is also our solace, our inspiration, and our most rational pleasure. It is a duty we owe to one another; it is our common debt to humanity."

Agnes Repplier, "The Luxury of Conversation," Compromises (1904)

New Quoatation

"It is not what we learn in conversation that enriches us. It is the elation that comes of swift contact with tingling currents of thought. It is the opening of our mental pores, and the stimulus of marshaling our ideas in words, of setting them forth as gallantly and as graciously as we can."

Agnes Repplier, "The Luxury of Conversation," Compromises (1904)

New Quoatation

"A man who listens because he has nothing to say can hardly be a source of inspiration. The only listening that counts is that of the talker who alternately absorbs and expresses ideas."

Agnes Repplier, "The Luxury of Conversation," Compromises (1904)

New Quoatation

"The choice of a topic which will bear analysis and support enthusiasm, is essential to the enjoyment of conversation."

Agnes Repplier, "The Luxury of Conversation," Compromises (1904)

New Quoatation

"If everybody floated with the tide of talk, placidity would soon end in stagnation. It is the strong backward stroke which stirs the ripples, and gives animation and variety."

Agnes Repplier, "The Luxury of Conversation," Compromises (1904)

New Quoatation

"We owe to one another all the wit and good humour we can command; and nothing so clears our mental vistas as sympathetic and intelligent conversation."

Agnes Repplier, "The Luxury of Conversation," Compromises (1904)

New Quoatation

"The thinkers of the world should by rights be guardians of the world's mirth ..."

Agnes Repplier, "The Gayety of Life," Compromises (1904)

New Quoatation

"... there are few nudities so objectionable as the naked truth."

Agnes Repplier, "The Gayety of Life," Compromises (1904)

New Quoatation

"If we could make up our minds to spare our friends all details of ill health, of money losses, of domestic annoyances, of altercations, of committee work, of grievances, provocations, and anxieties, we should sin less against the world's good-humor. It may not be given us to add to the treasury of mirth; but there is considerable merit in not robbing it."

Agnes Repplier, "The Gayety of Life," Compromises (1904)

New Quoatation

"Love is a malady, the common symptoms of which are the same in all patients ..."

Agnes Repplier, "French Love-Songs," Compromises (1904)

New Quoatation

"It is not an easy thing to be happy. It takes all the brains, and all the soul, and all the goodness we possess. We may fail of our happiness, strive we ever so bravely; but we are less likely to fail if we measure with judgment our chances and our capabilities."

Agnes Repplier, "The Spinster," Compromises (1904)

New Quoatation

"... abroad it is our habit to regard all other travelers in the light of personal and unpardonable grievances. They are intruders into our chosen realms of pleasure, they jar upon our sensibilities, they lessen our meager share of comforts, they are everywhere in our way, they are always an unnecessary feature in the landscape."

Agnes Repplier, "The Tourist," Compromises (1904)

New Quoatation

"A dead grief is easier to bear than a live trouble."

Agnes Repplier, "Allegra," Compromises (1904)

New Quoatation

"... the most comfortable characteristic of the period [1775-1825], and the one which incites our deepest envy, is the universal willingness to accept a good purpose as a substitute for good work."

Agnes Repplier, title essay, A Happy Half-Century (1908)

New Quoatation

"There is a natural limit to the success we wish our friends, even when we have spurred them on their way."

Agnes Repplier, "When Lalla Rookh Was Young," A Happy Half-Century (1908)

New Quoatation

"There was no escape from the letter-writer who, a hundred or a hundred and twenty-five years ago, captured a coveted correspondent. It would have been as easy to shake off an octopus or a boa-constrictor."

Agnes Repplier, "The Correspondent," A Happy Half-Century (1908)

New Quoatation

"[Mary Wortley Montagu] wrote more letters, with fewer punctuation marks, than any Englishwoman of her day; and her nephew, the fourth Baron Rokeby, nearly blinded himself in deciphering the two volumes of undated correspondence which were printed in 1810. Two more followed in 1813, after which the gallant Baron either died at his post or was smitten with despair; for sixty-eight cases of letters lay undisturbed ... 'Les morts n'écrivent point,' said Madame de Maintenon hopefully; but of what benefit is this inactivity, when we still continue to receive their letters?"

Agnes Repplier, "The Correspondent," A Happy Half-Century (1908)

New Quoatation

"There are many ways of asking a favor; but to assume that you are granting the favor that you ask shows spirit and invention."

Agnes Repplier, "The Literary Lady," A Happy Half-Century (1908)

New Quoatation

"The great dividing line between books that are made to be read and books that are made to be bought is not the purely modern thing it seems. We can trace it, if we try, back to the first printing-presses ..."

Agnes Repplier, "The Accursed Annual," A Happy Half-Century (1908)

New Quoatation

"The perfectly natural thing to do with an unreadable book is to give it away; and the publication, for more than a quarter of a century, of volumes which fulfilled this one purpose and no other is a pleasant proof, if proof were needed, of the business principles which underlay the enlightened activity of publishers."

Agnes Repplier, "The Accursed Annual," A Happy Half-Century (1908)

New Quoatation

"There are people who balk at small civilities on account of their manifest insincerity. ... It is better and more logical to accept all the polite phraseology which facilitates intercourse, and contributes to the sweetness of life. If we discarded the formal falsehoods which are the currency of conversation, we should not be one step nearer the vital things of truth."

Agnes Repplier, "A Question of Politeness," Americans and Others (1912)

New Quoatation

"There is no illusion so permanent as that which enables us to look backward with complacency; there is no mental process so deceptive as the comparing of recollections with realities."

Agnes Repplier, "A Question of Politeness," Americans and Others (1912)

New Quoatation

"... to be civilized is to be incapable of giving unnecessary offense, it is to have some quality of consideration for all who cross our path."

Agnes Repplier, "A Question of Politeness," Americans and Others (1912)

New Quoatation

"The essence of humor is that it should be unexpected, that it should embody an element of surprise, that it should startle us out of that reasonable gravity which, after all, must be our habitual frame of mind."

Agnes Repplier, "The Mission of Humor," Americans and Others (1912)

New Quoatation

"It takes time and trouble to persuade ourselves that the things we want to do are the things we ought to do."

Agnes Repplier, "Goodness and Gayety," Americans and Others (1912)

New Quoatation

"It has been wisely said that we cannot really love anybody at whom we never laugh."

Agnes Repplier, "Goodness and Gayety," Americans and Others (1912)

New Quoatation

"The English possess too many agreeable traits to permit them to be as much disliked as they think and hope they are."

Agnes Repplier, "The Estranging Sea," Americans and Others (1912)

New Quoatation

"Like simplicity, and candor, and other much-commended qualities, enthusiasm is charming until we meet it face to face, and cannot escape from its charm."

Agnes Repplier, "The Chill of Enthusiasm," Americans and Others (1912)

New Quoatation

"Why do so many ingenious theorists give fresh reasons every year for the decline of letter writing, and why do they assume, in derision of suffering humanity, that it has declined? They lament the lack of leisure, the lack of sentiment ... They talk of telegrams, and telephones, and postal cards, as if any discovery of science, any device of civilization, could eradicate from the human heart that passion for self-expression which is the impelling force of letters."

Agnes Repplier, "The Customary Correspondent," Americans and Others (1912)

New Quoatation

"A vast deal of ingenuity is wasted every year in evoking the undesirable, in the careful construction of objects which burden life. Frankenstein was a large rather than an isolated example."

Agnes Repplier, "The Benefactor," Americans and Others (1912)

New Quoatation

"We cannot hope to scale great moral heights by ignoring petty obligations."

Agnes Repplier, "The Benefactor," Americans and Others (1912)

New Quoatation

"The vanity of man revolts from the serene indifference of the cat."

Agnes Repplier, "The Grocer's Cat," Americans and Others (1912)

New Quoatation

"Believers in political faith-healing enjoy a supreme immunity from doubt."

Agnes Repplier, "Cost of Modern Sentiment," Counter-Currents (1916)

New Quoatation

"The gospel of cheerfulness, I had almost said the gospel of amusement, is preached by people who lack experience to people who lack vitality. There is a vague impression that the world would be a good world if it were only happy, that it would be happy if it were amused, and that it would be amused if plenty of artificial recreation -- that recreation for which we are now told every community stands responsible -- were provided for its entertainment."

Agnes Repplier, "Our Loss of Nerve," Counter-Currents (1916)

New Quoatation

"People who pin their faith to a catchword never feel the necessity of understanding anything."

Agnes Repplier, "Women and War," Counter-Currents (1916)

New Quoatation

"The pitfall of the feminist is the belief that the interests of men and women can ever be severed; that what brings sufferings to the one can leave the other unscathed."

Agnes Repplier, "Women and War," Counter-Currents (1916)

New Quoatation

"History is, and has always been trameled by facts. It may ignore some and deny others; but it cannot accommodate itself unreservedly to theories; it cannot be stripped of things evidenced in favor of things surmised."

Agnes Repplier, "Women and War," Counter-Currents (1916)

New Quoatation

"The well-ordered mind knows the value, no less than the charm, of reticence. The fruit of the tree of knowledge ... falls ripe from its stem; but those who have eaten with sobriety find no need to discuss the processes of digestion."

Agnes Repplier, "The Repeal of Reticence," Counter-Currents (1916)

New Quoatation

"No other nation cherishes this illusion. An Englishman knows that a Russian Jew cannot in five years, or in twenty-five years, become English; that his standards and ideals are not convertible into English standards and ideals. A Frenchman does not see in a Bulgarian or a Czech the making of another Frenchman."

Agnes Repplier, "The Modest Immigrant," Counter-Currents (1916)

New Quoatation

"Democracy forever teases us with the contrast between its ideals and its realities, between its heroic possibilities and its sorry achievements."

Agnes Repplier, "Americanism," Counter-Currents (1916)

New Quoatation

"If history in the making be a fluid thing, it swiftly crystallizes."

Agnes Repplier, "Living in History," Points of Friction (1920)

New Quoatation

"The sanguine assurance that men and nations can be legislated into goodness, that pressure from without is equivalent to a moral change within, needs a strong backing of inexperience."

Agnes Repplier, "Conservative's Consolations," Points of Friction (1920)

New Quoatation

"It is bad enough to be bad, but to be bad in bad taste is unpardonable."

Agnes Repplier, "Conservative's Consolations," Points of Friction (1920)

New Quoatation

"Every word misused revenges itself forever upon a writer's reputation."

Agnes Repplier, "Conservative's Consolations," Points of Friction (1920)

New Quoatation

"Economics and ethics have little in common."

Agnes Repplier, "Conservative's Consolations," Points of Friction (1920)

New Quoatation

"Where there is no temptation, there is no virtue."

Agnes Repplier, "Conservative's Consolations," Points of Friction (1920)

New Quoatation

"Innovations to which we are not committed are illuminating things."

Agnes Repplier, "Conservative's Consolations," Points of Friction (1920)

New Quoatation

"Resistance, which is the function of conservatism, is essential to orderly advance."

Agnes Repplier, "Conservative's Consolations," Points of Friction (1920)

New Quoatation

"Men who believe that, through some exceptional grace or good fortune, they have found God, feel little need of culture."

Agnes Repplier, "The Masterful Puritan," Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"It is difficult to admonish Frenchmen. Their habit of mind is unfavorable to preachment."

Agnes Repplier, "To Counsel the Doubtful," Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"The party which is out sees nothing but graft and incapacity in the party which is in; and the party which is in sees nothing but greed and animosity in the party which is out."

Agnes Repplier, "Are Americans Timid?" Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"... fair play is less characteristic of groups than of individuals."

Agnes Repplier, "Are Americans Timid?" Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"A world of vested interests is not a world which welcomes the disruptive force of candor."

Agnes Repplier, "Are Americans Timid?" Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"... the man who never tells an unpalatable truth 'at the wrong time' (the right time has yet to be discovered) is the man whose success in life is fairly well assured."

Agnes Repplier, "Are Americans Timid?" Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"[On Margot Asquith's autobiography:] Never before or since has any book been so much relished by its author."

Agnes Repplier, "Writing an Autobiography," Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"Next to the joy of the egotist is the joy of the detractor."

Agnes Repplier, "Writing an Autobiography," Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"To be brave in misfortune is to be worthy of manhood; to be wise in misfortune is to conquer fate."

Agnes Repplier, "Strayed Sympathies," Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"An historian without political passions is as rare as a wasp without a sting."

Agnes Repplier, "Strayed Sympathies," Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"... the friendships of nations, built on common interests, cannot survive the mutability of those interests, which are always liable to deflection."

Agnes Repplier, "Allies," Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"The comfortable thing about the study of history is that it inclines us to think hopefully of our own times."

Agnes Repplier, "Allies," Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"Need drives men to envy as fullness drives them to selfishness."

Agnes Repplier, "Allies," Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"Bargaining is essential to the life of the world; but nobody has ever claimed that it is an ennobling process."

Agnes Repplier, "Allies," Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"Humor hardens the heart, at least to the point of sanity ..."

Agnes Repplier, "They Had Their Day," Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"There is nothing in the world so incomprehensible as the joke we do not see."

Agnes Repplier, "The American Laughs," Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"Just as we are often moved to merriment for no other reason than that the occasion calls for seriousness, so we are correspondingly serious when invited too freely to be amused."

Agnes Repplier, "The American Laughs," Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"... there is no virtue in liking them, any more than there is virtue in liking wintry weather or stringed instruments. An affection for dogs is not, as we have been given to understand, a test of an open and generous disposition. Still less is their affection for us to be accepted as a guarantee of our integrity. The assumption that a dog knows a good from a bad human being when he sees one is unwarranted."

Agnes Repplier, "The Idolatrous Dog," Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"... a real dog, beloved and therefore pampered by his mistress, is a lamentable spectacle. He suffers from fatty degeneration of his moral being."

Agnes Repplier, "The Idolatrous Dog," Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"... our dogs will love and admire the meanest of us, and feed our colossal vanity with their uncritical homage."

Agnes Repplier, "The Idolatrous Dog," Under Dispute (1924)

New Quoatation

"Letter-writing on the part of a busy man or woman is the quintessence of generosity."

Agnes Repplier, in Grace Guiney, ed., Letters of Louise Imogen Guiney. vol. 1 (1926)

New Quoatation

"No rural community, no suburban community, can ever possess the distinctive qualities that city dwellers have for centuries given to the world."

Agnes Repplier, "Town and Suburb," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"Lovers of the town have been content, for the most part, to say they loved it. They do not brag about its uplifting qualities. They have none of the infernal smugness which makes the lover of the country insupportable."

Agnes Repplier, "Town and Suburb," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"There is a vast deal of make-believe in the carefully nurtured sentiment for country life, and the barefoot boy, and the mountain girl."

Agnes Repplier, "Town and Suburb," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"History is not written in the interests of morality."

Agnes Repplier, "Peace and the Pacifist," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"The cure-alls of the present day are infinitely various and infinitely obliging. Applied psychology, autosuggestion, and royal roads to learning or to wealth are urged upon us by kindly, if not altogether disinterested, reformers. Simple and easy systems for the dissolution of discord and strife; simple and easy systems for the development of personality and power. Booklets of counsel on 'How to Get What We Want,' which is impossible; booklets on 'Visualization,' warranted to make us want what we get, which is ignoble."

Agnes Repplier, "Cure-Alls," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"America has invested her religion as well as her morality in sound income-paying securities. She has adopted the unassailable position of a nation blessed because it deserves to be blessed; and her sons, whatever other theologies they may affect or disregard, subscribe unreservedly to this national creed."

Agnes Repplier, "Condescension in Americans," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"... the audience is the controlling factor in the actor's life. It is practically infallible, since there is no appeal from its verdict. It is a little like a supreme court composed of irresponsible minors."

Agnes Repplier, "Actor and Audience," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"The age of credulity is every age the world has ever known. Men have always turned from the ascertained, which is limited and discouraging, to the dubious, which is unlimited and full of hope for everybody."

Agnes Repplier, "The Public Looks at Pills," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"The delusions of the past seem fond and foolish. The delusions of the present seem subtle and sane."

Agnes Repplier, "The Public Looks at Pills," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"When the contemplative mind is a French mind, it is content, for the most part, to contemplate France. When the contemplative mind is an English mind, it is liable to be seized at any moment by an importunate desire to contemplate Morocco or Labrador."

Agnes Repplier, "The American Takes a Holiday," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"The soul begins to travel when the child begins to think."

Agnes Repplier, "The American Takes a Holiday," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"The impulse to travel is one of the hopeful symptoms of life."

Agnes Repplier, "The American Takes a Holiday," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"The tourist may complain of other tourists; but he would be lost without them. He may find them in his way, taking up the best seats in the motors, and the best tables in the hotel dining-rooms; but he grows amazingly intimate with them during the voyage, and not infrequently marries one of them when it is over."

Agnes Repplier, "The American Takes a Holiday," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"Traveling is, and has always been, more popular than the traveler."

Agnes Repplier, "The American Takes a Holiday," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"... the pleasure of possession, whether we possess trinkets, or offspring -- or possibly books, or prints, or chessmen, or postage stamps -- lies in showing these things to friends who are experiencing no immediate urge to look at them."

Agnes Repplier, "The Pleasure of Possession," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"Subtlety being an intellectual asset, film directors rightly conceive that it would be lost upon their audiences."

Agnes Repplier, "The Unconscious Humor of the Movies," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"Every true American likes to think in terms of thousands and millions. The word 'million' is probably the most pleasure-giving vocable in the language."

Agnes Repplier, "The Unconscious Humor of the Movies," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"Our belief in education is unbounded, our reverence for it is unfaltering, our loyalty to it is unshaken by reverses. Our passionate desire, not so much to acquire it as to bestow it, is the most animated of American traits."

Agnes Repplier, "The American Credo," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"It is because of our unassailable enthusiasm, our profound reverence for education, that we habitually demand of it the impossible. The teacher is expected to perform a choice and varied series of miracles."

Agnes Repplier, "The American Credo," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"It is as impossible to withhold education from the receptive mind, as it is impossible to force it upon the unreasoning."

Agnes Repplier, "The American Credo," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"There is no liberal education for the under-languaged."

Agnes Repplier, "A Vocabulary," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"I wonder what especial sanctity attaches itself to fifteen minutes. It is always the maximum and the minimum of time which will enable us to acquire languages, etiquette, personality, oratory ... One gathers that twelve minutes a day would be hopelessly inadequate, and twenty minutes a wasteful and ridiculous excess."

Agnes Repplier, "A Vocabulary," Times and Tendencies (1931)

New Quoatation

"Anyone, however, who has had dealings with dates knows that they are worse than elusive, they are perverse. Events do not happen at the right time, nor in their proper sequence. That sense of harmony with place and season which is so strong in the historian -- if he be a readable historian -- is lamentably lacking in history, which takes no pains to verify his most convincing statements."

Agnes Repplier, To Think of Tea! (1932)

New Quoatation

"When the milk of human kindness turns sour, it is a singularly unpalatable draught."

Agnes Repplier, To Think of Tea! (1932)

New Quoatation

"English civilization rests largely upon tea and cricket, with mighty spurts of enjoyment on Derby Day, and at Newmarket."

Agnes Repplier, To Think of Tea! (1932)

New Quoatation

"... the tea-hour is the hour of peace ... strife is lost in the hissing of the kettle -- a tranquilizing sound, second only to the purring of a cat."

Agnes Repplier, To Think of Tea! (1932)

New Quoatation

"It is claimed that the United States gets the cleanest and purest tea in the market, and certainly it is too good to warrant the nervous apprehension which strains and dilutes it into nothingness. The English do not strain their tea in the fervid fashion we do. They like to see a few leaves dawdling about the cup. They like to know what they are drinking."

Agnes Repplier, To Think of Tea! (1932)

New Quoatation

"Laughter springs from the lawless part of our nature, and is purifying only in so far as there is a natural and unschooled goodness in the human heart."

Agnes Repplier, In Pursuit of Laughter (1936)

New Quoatation

"Miserliness is the one vice that grows stronger with increasing years. It yields its sordid pleasures to the end."

Agnes Repplier, In Pursuit of Laughter (1936)

New Quoatation

"Wit is a thing capable of proof."

Agnes Repplier, In Pursuit of Laughter (1936)

New Quoatation

"People who cannot recognize a palpable absurdity are very much in the way of civilization."

Agnes Repplier, In Pursuit of Laughter (1936)

New Quoatation

"Neatness of phrase is so closely akin to wit that it is often accepted as its substitute."

Agnes Repplier, In Pursuit of Laughter (1936)

New Quoatation

"It is not depravity that afflicts the human race so much as a general lack of intelligence."

Agnes Repplier, In Pursuit of Laughter (1936)

New Quoatation

"Humor brings insight and tolerance. Irony brings a deeper and less friendly understanding."

Agnes Repplier, In Pursuit of Laughter (1936)

New Quoatation

"Science may carry us to Mars, but it will leave the earth peopled as ever by the inept."

Agnes Repplier, In Pursuit of Laughter (1936)

New Quoatation

"We know when we have had enough of a friend, and we know when a friend has had enough of us. The first truth is no more palatable than the second."

Agnes Repplier, Eight Decades (1937)

New Quoatation

"I am seventy years old, a gray age weighted with uncompromising biblical allusions. It ought to have a gray outlook, but it hasn't, because a glint of dazzling sunshine is dancing merrily ahead of me."

Agnes Repplier, Eight Decades (1937)

New Quoatation

"... I am eighty years old. There seems to be nothing to add to this statement. I have reached the age of undecorated facts -- facts that refuse to be softened by sentiment, or confused by nobility of phrase."

Agnes Repplier, Eight Decades (1937)

New Quoatation

"The clearsighted do not rule the world, but they sustain and console it."

Agnes Repplier, Eight Decades (1937)

New Quoatation

"It is not begging but the beggar, who has forfeited favor with the elect."

Agnes Repplier, in Emma Repplier, Agnes Repplier (1957)

New Quoatation

"If we go to church we are confronted with a system of begging so complicated and so resolute that all other demands sink into insignificance by its side."

Agnes Repplier, in Emma Repplier, Agnes Repplier (1957)

New Quoatation

"It is not easy to find happiness in ourselves, and it is not possible to find it elsewhere."

Agnes Repplier, in Emma Repplier, Agnes Repplier (1957)

New Quoatation

"It was hard to speed the male child up the stony heights of erudition, but it was harder still to check the female child at the crucial point, and keep her tottering decorously behind her brother."

Agnes Repplier, in Emma Repplier, Agnes Repplier (1957)

New Quoatation

"Mr. Theodore Dreiser's book about himself sounds like nothing but a loud, human purr."

Agnes Repplier, in Emma Repplier, Agnes Repplier (1957)

New Quoatation

"[On the radio:] ... a discovery that makes it possible for a man to deliver a speech and not only bore those nearby, but others hundreds of miles away."

Agnes Repplier, in Emma Repplier, Agnes Repplier (1957)

New Quoatation

"The mail begs for everything but my life."

Agnes Repplier, in Emma Repplier, Agnes Repplier (1957)

New Quoatation

"I do strive to think well of my fellow man, but no amount of striving can give me confidence in the wisdom of a congressional vote."

Agnes Repplier, in Emma Repplier, Agnes Repplier (1957)

New Quoatation

"It is unwise to feel too much if we think too little."

Agnes Repplier, in Emma Repplier, Agnes Repplier (1957)

New Quoatation

"[To the absent-minded young woman about to leave who picked up her hat and scarf, put them down again, gazed around distractedly, and finally said, 'There's something I meant to say but I've forgotten what it was':] Perhaps, my dear, it was 'goodbye.'"

Agnes Repplier, in Reader's Digest (1944)

New Quoatation

"The carefully fostered theory that schoolwork can be made easy and enjoyable breaks down as soon as anything, however trivial, has to be learned."

Agnes Repplier, American and Others (1912)

New Quoatation

Agnes Repplier, U.S. writer, historian, social critic
(1855 - 1950)